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The Laniakea supercluster of galaxies

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, September 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Citations

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164 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
187 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
The Laniakea supercluster of galaxies
Published in
Nature, September 2014
DOI 10.1038/nature13674
Pubmed ID
Authors

R. Brent Tully, Hélène Courtois, Yehuda Hoffman, Daniel Pomarède

Abstract

Galaxies congregate in clusters and along filaments, and are missing from large regions referred to as voids. These structures are seen in maps derived from spectroscopic surveys that reveal networks of structure that are interconnected with no clear boundaries. Extended regions with a high concentration of galaxies are called 'superclusters', although this term is not precise. There is, however, another way to analyse the structure. If the distance to each galaxy from Earth is directly measured, then the peculiar velocity can be derived from the subtraction of the mean cosmic expansion, the product of distance times the Hubble constant, from observed velocity. The peculiar velocity is the line-of-sight departure from the cosmic expansion and arises from gravitational perturbations; a map of peculiar velocities can be translated into a map of the distribution of matter. Here we report a map of structure made using a catalogue of peculiar velocities. We find locations where peculiar velocity flows diverge, as water does at watershed divides, and we trace the surface of divergent points that surrounds us. Within the volume enclosed by this surface, the motions of galaxies are inward after removal of the mean cosmic expansion and long range flows. We define a supercluster to be the volume within such a surface, and so we are defining the extent of our home supercluster, which we call Laniakea.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 265 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 187 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 3%
Canada 4 2%
Spain 2 1%
United Kingdom 2 1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Other 3 2%
Unknown 166 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 48 26%
Researcher 34 18%
Student > Bachelor 20 11%
Student > Master 19 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 13 7%
Other 36 19%
Unknown 17 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Physics and Astronomy 90 48%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 10%
Engineering 10 5%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 7 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 4%
Other 35 19%
Unknown 20 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1186. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 May 2022.
All research outputs
#8,293
of 21,257,749 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#994
of 87,525 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#54
of 215,849 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#14
of 873 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,257,749 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 87,525 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 97.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 215,849 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 873 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.