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Human-modified habitats facilitate forest-dwelling populations of an invasive predator, Vulpes vulpes

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
34 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
55 Mendeley
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Title
Human-modified habitats facilitate forest-dwelling populations of an invasive predator, Vulpes vulpes
Published in
Scientific Reports, September 2017
DOI 10.1038/s41598-017-12464-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bronwyn A. Hradsky, Alan Robley, Ray Alexander, Euan G. Ritchie, Alan York, Julian Di Stefano

Abstract

Invasive and over-abundant predators pose a major threat to biodiversity and often benefit from human activities. Effective management requires understanding predator use of human-modified habitats (including resource subsidies and disturbed environments), and individual variation within populations. We investigated selection for human-modified habitats by invasive red foxes, Vulpes vulpes, within two predominantly forested Australian landscapes. We predicted that foxes would select for human-modified habitats in their range locations and fine-scale movements, but that selection would vary between individuals. We GPS-tracked 19 foxes for 17-166 days; ranges covered 33 to >2500 ha. Approximately half the foxes selected for human-modified habitats at the range scale, with some 'commuting' more than five kilometres to farmland or townships at night. Two foxes used burnt forest intensively after a prescribed fire. In their fine-scale nocturnal movements, most foxes selected for human-modified habitats such as reservoirs, forest edges and roads, but there was considerable individual variation. Native fauna in fragmented and disturbed habitats are likely to be exposed to high rates of fox predation, and anthropogenic food resources may subsidise fox populations within the forest interior. Coordinating fox control across land-tenures, targeting specific landscape features, and limiting fox access to anthropogenic resources will be important for biodiversity conservation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 34 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 55 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 33%
Student > Master 12 22%
Researcher 9 16%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Other 2 4%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 7 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 36%
Environmental Science 18 33%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 12 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 28. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 July 2020.
All research outputs
#788,154
of 16,018,764 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#7,957
of 83,951 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22,965
of 279,827 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#16
of 127 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,018,764 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 83,951 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,827 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 127 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.