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Sensorimotor control of breathing in themdxmouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Physiology, October 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
twitter
11 tweeters
patent
1 patent
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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20 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
23 Mendeley
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Title
Sensorimotor control of breathing in themdxmouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy
Published in
Journal of Physiology, October 2017
DOI 10.1113/jp274792
Pubmed ID
Authors

David P. Burns, Arijit Roy, Eric F. Lucking, Fiona B. McDonald, Sam Gray, Richard J. Wilson, Deirdre Edge, Ken D. O'Halloran

Abstract

Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) hypoventilate with consequential arterial blood gas derangement relevant to disease progression. Whereas deficits in DMD diaphragm are recognized, there is a paucity of knowledge in respect of the neural control of breathing in dystrophinopathies. We sought to perform an analysis of respiratory control in a model of DMD, the mdx mouse. In eight week old male wild-type and mdx mice, ventilation and metabolism, carotid body afferent activity, and diaphragm muscle force-generating capacity, and muscle fibre size, distribution and centronucleation were determined. Diaphragm EMG activity and responsiveness to chemostimulation was determined. During normoxia, mdx mice hypoventilated, owing to a reduction in tidal volume. Basal CO2 production was not different between wild-type and mdx mice. Carotid sinus nerve responses to hyperoxia were blunted in mdx suggesting hypoactivity. However, carotid body, ventilatory and metabolic responses to hypoxia were equivalent in wild-type and mdx mice. Diaphragm force was severely depressed in mdx mice, with evidence of fibre remodelling and damage. Diaphragm EMG responses to chemoactivation were enhanced in mdx mice. We conclude that there is evidence of chronic hypoventilation in young mdx mice. Diaphragm dysfunction confers mechanical deficiency in mdx resulting in impaired capacity to generate normal tidal volume at rest and decreased absolute ventilation during chemoactivation. Enhanced mdx diaphragm EMG responsiveness suggests compensatory neuroplasticity facilitating respiratory motor output, which may extend to accessory muscles of breathing. Our results may have relevance to emerging treatments for human DMD aiming to preserve ventilatory capacity. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 22%
Researcher 3 13%
Student > Bachelor 2 9%
Student > Master 2 9%
Professor 1 4%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 7 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 17%
Psychology 3 13%
Neuroscience 3 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 13%
Social Sciences 1 4%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 7 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 47. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 March 2021.
All research outputs
#598,769
of 18,908,606 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Physiology
#321
of 8,435 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,744
of 288,655 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Physiology
#4
of 130 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,908,606 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,435 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 288,655 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 130 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.