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Low Intake of Vegetables, High Intake of Confectionary, and Unhealthy Eating Habits are Associated with Poor Sleep Quality among Middle‐aged Female Japanese Workers

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Occupational Health, November 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#6 of 624)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
98 X users
facebook
10 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
182 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
327 Mendeley
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Title
Low Intake of Vegetables, High Intake of Confectionary, and Unhealthy Eating Habits are Associated with Poor Sleep Quality among Middle‐aged Female Japanese Workers
Published in
Journal of Occupational Health, November 2014
DOI 10.1539/joh.14-0051-oa
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ryoko Katagiri, Keiko Asakura, Satomi Kobayashi, Hitomi Suga, Satoshi Sasaki, the Three‐generation Study of Women on Diets and Health Study Group

Abstract

Objectives: Although workers with poor sleep quality are reported to have problems with work performance, few studies have assessed the association between dietary factors and sleep quality using validated indexes. Here, we examined this association using information acquired from validated questionnaires. Methods: A total of 3,129 female workers aged 34 to 65 years were analyzed. Dietary intake was assessed using a self-administered diet history questionnaire (DHQ), and subjective sleep quality was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). The relationship between the intake of several food groups and nutrients and sleep quality was examined using multivariable logistic regression models. The effect of eating habits on sleep quality was also examined. Results: Poor sleep quality was associated with low intake of vegetables (p for trend 0.002) and fish (p for trend 0.04) and high intake of confectionary (p for trend 0.004) and noodles (p for trend 0.03) after adjustment for potential confounding factors (age, body mass index, physical activity, depression score, employment status, alcohol intake and smoking status). Poor sleep quality was also significantly and positively associated with consumption of energy drinks and sugar-sweetened beverages, skipping breakfast, and eating irregularly. In addition, poor sleep quality was significantly associated with high carbohydrate intake (p for trend 0.03). Conclusion: A low intake of vegetables and fish, high intake of confectionary and noodles and unhealthy eating habits were independently associated with poor sleep quality. Poor sleep quality was also associated with high carbohydrate intake in free-living Japanese middle-aged female workers.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 98 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 327 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Malaysia 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 324 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 54 17%
Student > Master 48 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 33 10%
Researcher 25 8%
Student > Postgraduate 18 6%
Other 52 16%
Unknown 97 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 80 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 47 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 5%
Psychology 12 4%
Social Sciences 11 3%
Other 41 13%
Unknown 121 37%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 147. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 December 2023.
All research outputs
#278,755
of 25,318,210 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Occupational Health
#6
of 624 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,100
of 374,700 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Occupational Health
#1
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,318,210 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 624 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 374,700 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them