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“You Don’t Feel”: The Experience of Youth Benzodiazepine Misuse in Ireland

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, September 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

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Title
“You Don’t Feel”: The Experience of Youth Benzodiazepine Misuse in Ireland
Published in
Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, September 2017
DOI 10.1080/02791072.2017.1371365
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kevin D. Murphy, Sharon Lambert, Suzanne McCarthy, Laura J. Sahm, Stephen Byrne

Abstract

There are negative effects to inappropriate use of benzodiazepines, yet the percentage of young people in Ireland experimenting with benzodiazepines has increased. There is a paucity of research about why Irish young people misuse benzodiazepines. In this study, people between 18 and 25 years attending substance misuse services in the south of Ireland (N = 13) were interviewed in a semi-structured style between June 2012 and April 2013. Content analysis was performed. The main motivations for benzodiazepine misuse were to self-regulate negative emotions and to induce dissociation from their environment. Interviewees also described the consequences of benzodiazepine misuse, such as disengagement from family relationships and other protective environments such as school and sports clubs. The consequences of chronic misuse were discussed, such as the compulsion to take more benzodiazepines despite experiencing severe side-effects. The incidence of paradoxical aggression on benzodiazepines is also explored. Education about benzodiazepines and their risks to young people, families, and the public may reduce benzodiazepine misuse. Future research on the role of trauma and mental health in young people's substance misuse is needed.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 101 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 101 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 21 21%
Researcher 11 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 10%
Student > Bachelor 6 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 3%
Other 10 10%
Unknown 40 40%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 17 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 7 7%
Sports and Recreations 4 4%
Social Sciences 4 4%
Other 14 14%
Unknown 43 43%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 August 2020.
All research outputs
#2,589,898
of 25,200,621 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Psychoactive Drugs
#214
of 1,038 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#47,532
of 326,516 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Psychoactive Drugs
#4
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,200,621 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,038 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 326,516 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.