↓ Skip to main content

Gut microbiota, the pharmabiotics they produce and host health

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, September 2014
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
8 X users
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
130 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
317 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Gut microbiota, the pharmabiotics they produce and host health
Published in
Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, September 2014
DOI 10.1017/s0029665114001426
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elaine Patterson, John F. Cryan, Gerald F. Fitzgerald, R. Paul Ross, Timothy G. Dinan, Catherine Stanton

Abstract

A healthy gut microbiota plays many crucial functions in the host, being involved in the correct development and functioning of the immune system, assisting in the digestion of certain foods and in the production of health-beneficial bioactive metabolites or 'pharmabiotics'. These include bioactive lipids (including SCFA and conjugated linoleic acid) antimicrobials and exopolysaccharides in addition to nutrients, including vitamins B and K. Alterations in the composition of the gut microbiota and reductions in microbial diversity are highlighted in many disease states, possibly rendering the host susceptible to infection and consequently negatively affecting innate immune function. Evidence is also emerging of microbially produced molecules with neuroactive functions that can have influences across the brain-gut axis. For example, γ-aminobutyric acid, serotonin, catecholamines and acetylcholine may modulate neural signalling within the enteric nervous system, when released in the intestinal lumen and consequently signal brain function and behaviour. Dietary supplementation with probiotics and prebiotics are the most widely used dietary adjuncts to modulate the gut microbiota. Furthermore, evidence is emerging of the interactions between administered microbes and dietary substrates, leading to the production of pharmabiotics, which may directly or indirectly positively influence human health.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 317 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Unknown 315 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 54 17%
Student > Bachelor 47 15%
Researcher 42 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 40 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 19 6%
Other 58 18%
Unknown 57 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 56 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 53 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 43 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 14 4%
Other 62 20%
Unknown 72 23%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 49. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 February 2018.
All research outputs
#867,789
of 25,654,806 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Nutrition Society
#107
of 1,714 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,645
of 250,715 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Nutrition Society
#3
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,654,806 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,714 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 250,715 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.