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Tobacco smoking and tuberculosis treatment outcomes: a prospective cohort study in Georgia

Overview of attention for article published in Bulletin of the World Health Organization, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source

Citations

dimensions_citation
39 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
158 Mendeley
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Title
Tobacco smoking and tuberculosis treatment outcomes: a prospective cohort study in Georgia
Published in
Bulletin of the World Health Organization, March 2015
DOI 10.2471/blt.14.147439
Pubmed ID
Authors

Medea Gegia, Matthew J Magee, Russell R Kempker, Iagor Kalandadze, Tsira Chakhaia, Jonathan E Golub, Henry M Blumberg

Abstract

To assess the effect of tobacco smoking on the outcome of tuberculosis treatment in Tbilisi, Georgia. We conducted a prospective cohort study of adults with laboratory-confirmed tuberculosis from May 2011 to November 2013. History of tobacco smoking was collected using a standardized questionnaire adapted from the global adult tobacco survey. We considered tuberculosis therapy to have a poor outcome if participants defaulted, failed treatment or died. We used multivariable regressions to estimate the risk of a poor treatment outcome. Of the 591 tuberculosis patients enrolled, 188 (31.8%) were past smokers and 271 (45.9%) were current smokers. Ninety (33.2%) of the current smokers and 24 (18.2%) of the participants who had never smoked had previously been treated for tuberculosis (P < 0.01). Treatment outcome data were available for 524 of the participants, of whom 128 (24.4%) - including 80 (32.9%) of the 243 current smokers and 21 (17.2%) of the 122 individuals who had never smoked - had a poor treatment outcome. Compared with those who had never smoked, current smokers had an increased risk of poor treatment outcome (adjusted relative risk, aRR: 1.70; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.00-2.90). Those who had ceased smoking more than two months before enrolment did not have such an increased risk (aRR: 1.01; 95% CI: 0.51-1.99). There is a high prevalence of smoking among patients with tuberculosis in Georgia and smoking increases the risk of a poor treatment outcome.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 158 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 2 1%
United States 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 153 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 34 22%
Student > Bachelor 20 13%
Researcher 15 9%
Student > Postgraduate 14 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 7%
Other 39 25%
Unknown 25 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 66 42%
Nursing and Health Professions 18 11%
Social Sciences 11 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 3%
Other 15 9%
Unknown 36 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 September 2017.
All research outputs
#3,292,974
of 11,682,907 outputs
Outputs from Bulletin of the World Health Organization
#694
of 1,747 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#93,748
of 268,721 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Bulletin of the World Health Organization
#27
of 36 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,682,907 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,747 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.7. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,721 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 36 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.