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Joint cross-correlation analysis reveals complex, time-dependent functional relationship between cortical neurons and arm electromyograms

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neurophysiology, December 2014
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38 Mendeley
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Title
Joint cross-correlation analysis reveals complex, time-dependent functional relationship between cortical neurons and arm electromyograms
Published in
Journal of Neurophysiology, December 2014
DOI 10.1152/jn.00031.2013
Pubmed ID
Authors

Katie Z. Zhuang, Mikhail A. Lebedev, Miguel A. L. Nicolelis

Abstract

Correlation between cortical activity and electromyographic (EMG) activity of limb muscles has long been a subject of neurophysiological studies, especially in terms of corticospinal connectivity. Interest in this issue has recently increased due to the development of brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) with output signals that mimic muscle force. For this study, three monkeys were implanted with multielectrode arrays in multiple cortical areas. One monkey performed self-timed touch pad presses, whereas the other two executed arm reaching movements. We analyzed the dynamic relationship between cortical neuronal activity and arm EMGs using a joint cross-correlation (JCC) analysis that evaluated trial-by-trial correlation as a function of time intervals within a trial. JCCs revealed transient correlations between the EMGs of multiple muscles and neural activity in motor, premotor and somatosensory cortical areas. Matching results were obtained using spike-triggered averages (STAs) corrected by subtracting trial-shuffled data. Compared to STAs, JCCs more readily revealed dynamical changes in cortico-EMG correlations. JCCs showed that correlation peaks often sharpened around movement times and broadened during delay intervals. Furthermore, JCC patterns were directionally selective for the arm reaching task. We propose that such highly dynamic, task dependent and distributed relationships between cortical activity and EMGs should be taken into consideration for future BMIs that generate EMG-like signals.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 5%
United Kingdom 1 3%
Brazil 1 3%
Canada 1 3%
France 1 3%
Unknown 32 84%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 29%
Researcher 10 26%
Student > Master 5 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 1 3%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 11 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 26%
Engineering 6 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 13%
Psychology 1 3%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 2 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 January 2015.
All research outputs
#9,604,168
of 12,505,093 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neurophysiology
#3,845
of 5,018 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#124,997
of 202,879 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neurophysiology
#55
of 113 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,505,093 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,018 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 202,879 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 113 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.