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Bidirectional associations between binge eating and restriction in anorexia nervosa. An ecological momentary assessment study

Overview of attention for article published in Appetite
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
25 Mendeley
Title
Bidirectional associations between binge eating and restriction in anorexia nervosa. An ecological momentary assessment study
Published in
Appetite
DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2014.08.014
Pubmed ID
Abstract

This study examined the association between restrictive eating behaviors and binge eating in anorexia nervosa (AN) using data collected in the natural environment. Women (N = 118) with DSM-IV full or subthreshold AN reported eating disorder behaviors, including binge eating episodes, going ≥ 8 waking hours without eating, and skipping meals, during 2 weeks of ecological momentary assessment (EMA). Time-lagged generalized estimating equations tested the following hypotheses: 1) dietary restriction would predict binge eating while controlling for binge eating the previous day; 2) binge eating would predict restriction the subsequent day while controlling for restriction the previous day. After controlling for relevant covariates, the hypotheses were not supported; however, there appeared to be a cumulative effect of repeatedly going 8 consecutive hours without eating (i.e. fasting) on the risk of binge eating among individuals who recently engaged in binge eating. In addition, skipping meals was associated with a lower risk of same day binge eating. The relationship between binge eating and dietary restriction appears to be complex and may vary by type of restrictive eating behavior. Future research should aim to further clarify the nature of the interaction of binge eating and restrictive eating among individuals with AN in order to effectively eliminate these behaviors in treatment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 4%
Unknown 24 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 28%
Student > Bachelor 5 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 12%
Unspecified 3 12%
Other 3 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 12 48%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 20%
Unspecified 3 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 8%
Environmental Science 1 4%
Other 2 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 January 2015.
All research outputs
#1,919,589
of 4,758,711 outputs
Outputs from Appetite
#841
of 1,467 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#43,482
of 120,093 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Appetite
#25
of 34 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,758,711 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 58th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,467 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.1. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 120,093 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 34 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.