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Ecological Risks of Shale Oil and Gas Development to Wildlife, Aquatic Resources and their Habitats

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Technology, September 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
2 policy sources
twitter
8 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
87 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
206 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Ecological Risks of Shale Oil and Gas Development to Wildlife, Aquatic Resources and their Habitats
Published in
Environmental Science & Technology, September 2014
DOI 10.1021/es5020482
Pubmed ID
Authors

Margaret C. Brittingham, Kelly O. Maloney, Aïda M. Farag, David D. Harper, Zachary H. Bowen

Abstract

Technological advances in hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling have led to the exploration and exploitation of shale oil and gas both nationally and internationally. Extensive development of shale resources has occurred within the United States over the past decade, yet full build out is not expected to occur for years. Moreover, countries across the globe have large shale resources and are beginning to explore extraction of these resources. Extraction of shale resources is a multistep process that includes site identification, well pad and infrastructure development, well drilling, high-volume hydraulic fracturing and production; each with its own propensity to affect associated ecosystems. Some potential effects, for example from well pad, road and pipeline development, will likely be similar to other anthropogenic activities like conventional gas drilling, land clearing, exurban and agricultural development and surface mining (e.g., habitat fragmentation and sedimentation). Therefore, we can use the large body of literature available on the ecological effects of these activities to estimate potential effects from shale development on nearby ecosystems. However, other effects, such as accidental release of wastewaters, are novel to the shale gas extraction process making it harder to predict potential outcomes. Here, we review current knowledge of the effects of high-volume hydraulic fracturing coupled with horizontal drilling on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems in the contiguous United States, an area that includes 20 shale plays many of which have experienced extensive development over the past decade. We conclude that species and habitats most at risk are ones where there is an extensive overlap between a species range or habitat type and one of the shale plays (leading to high vulnerability) coupled with intrinsic characteristics such as limited range, small population size, specialized habitat requirements, and high sensitivity to disturbance. Examples include core forest habitat and forest specialists, sagebrush habitat and specialists, vernal pond inhabitants and stream biota. We suggest five general areas of research and monitoring that could aid in development of effective guidelines and policies to minimize negative impacts and protect vulnerable species and ecosystems: (1) spatial analyses, (2) species-based modeling, (3) vulnerability assessments, (4) ecoregional assessments, and (5) threshold and toxicity evaluations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 206 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 2%
Mexico 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
Ecuador 1 <1%
Unknown 198 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 43 21%
Student > Master 43 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 32 16%
Student > Bachelor 24 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 12 6%
Other 31 15%
Unknown 21 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 63 31%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 48 23%
Engineering 19 9%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 15 7%
Chemistry 4 2%
Other 21 10%
Unknown 36 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 November 2018.
All research outputs
#1,779,035
of 15,642,397 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Technology
#2,370
of 15,315 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,510
of 205,368 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Technology
#57
of 293 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,642,397 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 15,315 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 205,368 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 293 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.