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Heterogeneous Occupancy and Density Estimates of the Pathogenic Fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in Waters of North America

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, September 2014
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
21 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
49 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
120 Mendeley
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Title
Heterogeneous Occupancy and Density Estimates of the Pathogenic Fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in Waters of North America
Published in
PLoS ONE, September 2014
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0106790
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tara Chestnut, Chauncey Anderson, Radu Popa, Andrew R. Blaustein, Mary Voytek, Deanna H. Olson, Julie Kirshtein

Abstract

Biodiversity losses are occurring worldwide due to a combination of stressors. For example, by one estimate, 40% of amphibian species are vulnerable to extinction, and disease is one threat to amphibian populations. The emerging infectious disease chytridiomycosis, caused by the aquatic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), is a contributor to amphibian declines worldwide. Bd research has focused on the dynamics of the pathogen in its amphibian hosts, with little emphasis on investigating the dynamics of free-living Bd. Therefore, we investigated patterns of Bd occupancy and density in amphibian habitats using occupancy models, powerful tools for estimating site occupancy and detection probability. Occupancy models have been used to investigate diseases where the focus was on pathogen occurrence in the host. We applied occupancy models to investigate free-living Bd in North American surface waters to determine Bd seasonality, relationships between Bd site occupancy and habitat attributes, and probability of detection from water samples as a function of the number of samples, sample volume, and water quality. We also report on the temporal patterns of Bd density from a 4-year case study of a Bd-positive wetland. We provide evidence that Bd occurs in the environment year-round. Bd exhibited temporal and spatial heterogeneity in density, but did not exhibit seasonality in occupancy. Bd was detected in all months, typically at less than 100 zoospores L(-1). The highest density observed was ∼3 million zoospores L(-1). We detected Bd in 47% of sites sampled, but estimated that Bd occupied 61% of sites, highlighting the importance of accounting for imperfect detection. When Bd was present, there was a 95% chance of detecting it with four samples of 600 ml of water or five samples of 60 mL. Our findings provide important baseline information to advance the study of Bd disease ecology, and advance our understanding of amphibian exposure to free-living Bd in aquatic habitats over time.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 21 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 120 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 7 6%
Spain 1 <1%
Slovenia 1 <1%
Unknown 111 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 27 23%
Researcher 27 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 18%
Student > Bachelor 16 13%
Other 7 6%
Other 14 12%
Unknown 7 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 64 53%
Environmental Science 23 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 9%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 3%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 2%
Other 5 4%
Unknown 11 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 32. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 March 2020.
All research outputs
#678,842
of 15,842,075 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#10,726
of 156,846 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,492
of 171,713 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#288
of 2,831 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,842,075 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 156,846 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 171,713 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2,831 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.