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Behavioral sensitivity of Japanese children with and without ADHD to changing reinforcer availability: an experimental study using signal detection methodology

Overview of attention for article published in Behavioral and Brain Functions, September 2017
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Title
Behavioral sensitivity of Japanese children with and without ADHD to changing reinforcer availability: an experimental study using signal detection methodology
Published in
Behavioral and Brain Functions, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12993-017-0131-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Emi Furukawa, Shizuka Shimabukuro, Brent Alsop, Gail Tripp

Abstract

Most research on motivational processes in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been undertaken in Western Europe and North America. The extent to which these findings apply to other cultural groups is unclear. The current study evaluated the behavioral sensitivity of Japanese children with and without ADHD to changing reward availability. Forty-one school-aged children, 19 diagnosed with DSM-IV ADHD, completed a signal-detection task in which correct discriminations between two stimuli were associated with different reinforcement frequencies. The response alternative associated with the higher rate of reinforcement switched twice during the task without warning. Both groups of children developed an initial bias toward the more frequently reinforced response alternative. When the reward contingencies switched the response allocation (bias) of the control group children followed suit. The response bias scores of the children with ADHD did not, suggesting impaired tracking of reward availability over time. Japanese children with ADHD adjust their behavioral responses to changing reinforcer availability less than their typically developing peers. This is not explained by poor attention to task or a lack of sensitivity to reward. The current results are consistent with altered sensitivity to changing reward contingencies identified in non-Japanese samples of children with ADHD. Irrespective of their country of origin, children with ADHD will likely benefit from behavioral expectations and reinforcement contingencies being made explicit together with high rates of reinforcement for appropriate behaviors.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 21 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 24%
Student > Bachelor 4 19%
Researcher 4 19%
Unspecified 4 19%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 10%
Other 2 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 6 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 24%
Psychology 5 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 5%
Other 2 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 November 2017.
All research outputs
#6,981,687
of 12,149,975 outputs
Outputs from Behavioral and Brain Functions
#167
of 350 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#130,430
of 271,055 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Behavioral and Brain Functions
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,149,975 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 350 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them