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Should Physicians Consider the Environmental Effects of Prescribing Antibiotics?

Overview of attention for article published in AMA Journal of Ethics, October 2017
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47 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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9 Mendeley
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Title
Should Physicians Consider the Environmental Effects of Prescribing Antibiotics?
Published in
AMA Journal of Ethics, October 2017
DOI 10.1001/journalofethics.2017.19.10.peer1-1710
Pubmed ID
Abstract

Pharmaceuticals are beginning to receive attention as a source of pollution in aquatic environments. Yet the impact of physician prescription patterns on water resources is not often discussed in clinical decision making. Here, we comment on a case in which empiric antibiotic treatment might benefit a patient while simultaneously being detrimental to the aquatic environment. We first highlight the potential harm caused by this prescription from its production to its disposal. We then suggest that Van Rensselaer Potter's original conceptualization of bioethics can be used to balance clinicians' obligations to protect individual, public, and environmental health.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 47 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 33%
Other 2 22%
Researcher 2 22%
Student > Master 1 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 11%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 33%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 22%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 11%
Social Sciences 1 11%
Environmental Science 1 11%
Other 1 11%