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The Angelina Jolie effect: how high celebrity profile can have a major impact on provision of cancer related services

Overview of attention for article published in Breast Cancer Research, September 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#3 of 2,072)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Citations

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258 Dimensions

Readers on

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247 Mendeley
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Title
The Angelina Jolie effect: how high celebrity profile can have a major impact on provision of cancer related services
Published in
Breast Cancer Research, September 2014
DOI 10.1186/s13058-014-0442-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

D Gareth R Evans, Julian Barwell, Diana M Eccles, Amanda Collins, Louise Izatt, Chris Jacobs, Alan Donaldson, Angela F Brady, Andrew Cuthbert, Rachel Harrison, Sue Thomas, Anthony Howell, The FH02 Study Group, RGC teams, Zosia Miedzybrodzka, Alex Murray

Abstract

It is frequent for news items to lead to a short lived temporary increase in interest in a particular health related service, however it is rare for this to have a long lasting effect. In 2013, in the UK in particular, there has been unprecedented publicity in hereditary breast cancer, with Angelina Jolie's decision to have genetic testing for the BRCA1 gene and subsequently undergo risk reducing mastectomy (RRM), and a pre-release of the NICE guidelines on familial breast cancer in January and their final release on 26th June. The release of NICE guidelines created a lot of publicity over the potential for use of chemoprevention using tamoxifen or raloxifene. However, the longest lasting news story was the release of details of film actress Angelina Jolie's genetic test and surgery.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 92 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 247 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Unknown 242 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 42 17%
Student > Master 36 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 33 13%
Researcher 26 11%
Other 15 6%
Other 42 17%
Unknown 53 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 56 23%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 25 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 24 10%
Social Sciences 17 7%
Psychology 16 6%
Other 51 21%
Unknown 58 23%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 821. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 February 2024.
All research outputs
#23,209
of 25,890,819 outputs
Outputs from Breast Cancer Research
#3
of 2,072 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#119
of 262,021 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Breast Cancer Research
#1
of 46 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,890,819 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,072 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,021 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 46 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.