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Bartonella species pathogenic for humans infect pets, free-ranging wild mammals and their ectoparasites in the Caatinga biome, Northeastern Brazil: a serological and molecular study

Overview of attention for article published in Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases, May 2017
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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23 Dimensions

Readers on

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49 Mendeley
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Title
Bartonella species pathogenic for humans infect pets, free-ranging wild mammals and their ectoparasites in the Caatinga biome, Northeastern Brazil: a serological and molecular study
Published in
Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases, May 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.bjid.2017.02.002
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mariana Campos Fontalvo, Alexsandra Rodrigues de Mendonça Favacho, Andreina de Carvalho Araujo, Naylla Mayana dos Santos, Glauber Meneses Barboza de Oliveira, Daniel Moura Aguiar, Elba Regina Sampaio de Lemos, Mauricio Claudio Horta

Abstract

This study verified the occurrence of Bartonella spp. in dogs, cats, wild mammals and their ectoparasites in Petrolina and Lagoa Grande Counties, Pernambuco, located in a semi-arid region in Northeastern Brazil. Anti-Bartonella spp. antibodies were detected by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) in 24.8% of dogs (27/109) and in 15% of cats (6/40). Bartonella sp. DNA was identified by PCR performed on DNA extracted from blood and ectoparasites using primers targeting Bartonella sp. gltA and ribC genes in 100% (9/9) of Pulex irritans from Cerdocyon thous, 57.4% (35/61) of P. irritans from dogs, 2.3% (1/43) of Ctenocephalides felis felis from dogs, 53.3% (24/45) of C. felis felis from cats, and 10% (1/10) of Polyplax spp. from T. apereoides. DNA sequencing identified Bartonella clarridgeiae and Bartonella henselae in C. felis felis from cats, Bartonella rochalimae in P. irritans from dog and C. thous, and Bartonella vinsoni berkhofii in P. irritans from dog.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 49 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 22%
Student > Bachelor 7 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 10%
Professor 3 6%
Other 10 20%
Unknown 7 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 19 39%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 20%
Engineering 2 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 11 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 October 2017.
All research outputs
#12,411,963
of 19,458,329 outputs
Outputs from Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases
#264
of 578 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#164,899
of 292,696 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases
#5
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,458,329 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 578 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 292,696 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.