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New Research Tools for Urogenital Schistosomiasis

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Infectious Diseases, September 2014
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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52 Mendeley
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Title
New Research Tools for Urogenital Schistosomiasis
Published in
Journal of Infectious Diseases, September 2014
DOI 10.1093/infdis/jiu527
Pubmed ID
Authors

G. Rinaldi, N. D. Young, J. D. Honeycutt, P. J. Brindley, R. B. Gasser, M. H. Hsieh

Abstract

Approximately 200 000 000 people have schistosomiasis (schistosome infection). Among the schistosomes, Schistosoma haematobium is responsible for the most infections, which are present in 110 million people globally, mostly in sub-Saharan Africa. This pathogen causes an astonishing breadth of sequelae: hematuria, anemia, dysuria, stunting, uremia, bladder cancer, urosepsis, and human immunodeficiency virus coinfection. Refined estimates of the impact of schistosomiasis on quality of life suggest that it rivals malaria. Despite S. haematobium's importance, relevant research has lagged. Here, we review advances that will deepen knowledge of S. haematobium. Three sets of breakthroughs will accelerate discoveries in the pathogenesis of urogenital schistosomiasis (UGS): (1) comparative genomics, (2) the development of functional genomic tools, and (3) the use of animal models to explore S. haematobium-host interactions. Comparative genomics for S. haematobium is feasible, given the sequencing of multiple schistosome genomes. Features of the S. haematobium genome that are conserved among platyhelminth species and others that are unique to S. haematobium may provide novel diagnostic and drug targets for UGS. Although there are technical hurdles, the integrated use of these approaches can elucidate host-pathogen interactions during this infection and can inform the development of techniques for investigating schistosomes in their human and snail hosts and the development of therapeutics and vaccines for the control of UGS.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 52 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Burkina Faso 2 4%
Australia 2 4%
United States 2 4%
United Kingdom 2 4%
Portugal 1 2%
Unknown 43 83%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 19%
Researcher 9 17%
Student > Postgraduate 8 15%
Student > Master 6 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 10%
Other 14 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 10%
Unspecified 5 10%
Other 14 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 October 2014.
All research outputs
#7,222,353
of 12,027,003 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Infectious Diseases
#8,428
of 10,275 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#100,716
of 212,673 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Infectious Diseases
#71
of 121 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,027,003 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,275 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 212,673 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 121 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.