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Cognitive dysfunction in pediatric multiple sclerosis

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, July 2014
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Mentioned by

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2 X users

Citations

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29 Dimensions

Readers on

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88 Mendeley
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Title
Cognitive dysfunction in pediatric multiple sclerosis
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, July 2014
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s48495
Pubmed ID
Authors

Agnese Suppiej, Elisa Cainelli

Abstract

Cognitive and neuropsychological impairments are well documented in adult multiple sclerosis (MS). Research has only recently focused on cognitive disabilities in pediatric cases, highlighting some differences between pediatric and adult cases. Impairments in several functions have been reported in children, particularly in relation to attention, processing speed, visual-motor skills, and language. Language seems to be particularly vulnerable in pediatric MS, unlike in adults in whom it is usually preserved. Deficits in executive functions, which are considered MS-specific in adults, have been inconsistently reported in children. In children, as compared to adults, the relationship between cognitive dysfunctions and the two other main symptoms of MS, fatigue and psychiatric disorders, was poorly explored. Furthermore, data on the correlations of cognitive impairments with clinical and neuroimaging features are scarce in children, and the results are often incongruent; interestingly, involvement of corpus callosum and reduced thalamic volume differentiated patients identified as having a cognitive impairment from those without a cognitive impairment. Further studies about pediatric MS are needed in order to better understand the impact of the disease on brain development and the resulting effect on cognitive functions, particularly with respect to different therapeutic strategies.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 88 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 86 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 16%
Student > Bachelor 14 16%
Researcher 9 10%
Student > Master 9 10%
Other 6 7%
Other 20 23%
Unknown 16 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 23 26%
Psychology 23 26%
Neuroscience 6 7%
Sports and Recreations 5 6%
Unspecified 4 5%
Other 7 8%
Unknown 20 23%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 September 2015.
All research outputs
#15,172,875
of 25,383,225 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#1,423
of 3,129 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#118,826
of 236,261 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#28
of 54 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,383,225 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,129 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 236,261 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 54 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.