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Long-term safety of human retinal progenitor cell transplantation in retinitis pigmentosa patients

Overview of attention for article published in Stem Cell Research & Therapy, September 2017
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Title
Long-term safety of human retinal progenitor cell transplantation in retinitis pigmentosa patients
Published in
Stem Cell Research & Therapy, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13287-017-0661-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yong Liu, Shao Jun Chen, Shi Ying Li, Ling Hui Qu, Xiao Hong Meng, Yi Wang, Hai Wei Xu, Zhi Qing Liang, Zheng Qin Yin

Abstract

Retinitis pigmentosa is a common genetic disease that causes retinal degeneration and blindness for which there is currently no curable treatment available. Vision preservation was observed in retinitis pigmentosa animal models after retinal stem cell transplantation. However, long-term safety studies and visual assessment have not been thoroughly tested in retinitis pigmentosa patients. In our pre-clinical study, purified human fetal-derived retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) were transplanted into the diseased retina of Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats, a model of retinal degeneration. Based on these results, we conducted a phase I clinical trial to establish the safety and tolerability of transplantation of RPCs in eight patients with advanced retinitis pigmentosa. Patients were studied for 24 months. After RPC transplantation in RCS rats, we observed moderate recovery of vision and maintenance of the outer nuclear layer thickness. Most importantly, we did not find tumor formation or immune rejection. In the retinis pigmentosa patients given RPC injections, we also did not observe immunological rejection or tumorigenesis when immunosuppressive agents were not administered. We observed a significant improvement in visual acuity (P < 0.05) in five patients and an increase in retinal sensitivity of pupillary responses in three of the eight patients between 2 and 6 months after the transplant, but this improvement did not appear by 12 months. Our study for the first time confirmed the long-term safety and feasibility of vision repair by stem cell therapy in patients blinded by retinitis pigmentosa. WHO Trial Registration, ChiCTR-TNRC-08000193 . Retrospectively registered on 5 December 2008.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 26%
Unspecified 6 19%
Student > Master 6 19%
Student > Postgraduate 3 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 10%
Other 5 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 29%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 23%
Unspecified 7 23%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 10%
Neuroscience 2 6%
Other 3 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 October 2017.
All research outputs
#10,522,318
of 11,874,340 outputs
Outputs from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#855
of 974 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#229,854
of 272,601 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#58
of 61 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,874,340 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 974 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,601 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 61 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.