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Sexually selected skin colour is heritable and related to fecundity in a non-human primate

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, November 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
25 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
24 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
76 Mendeley
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Title
Sexually selected skin colour is heritable and related to fecundity in a non-human primate
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, November 2014
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2014.1602
Pubmed ID
Authors

Constance Dubuc, Sandra Winters, William L. Allen, Lauren J. N. Brent, Julie Cascio, Dario Maestripieri, Angelina V. Ruiz-Lambides, Anja Widdig, James P. Higham

Abstract

Sexual selection promotes the prevalence of heritable traits that increase an individual's reproductive rate. Despite theoretically strong directional selection, sexually selected traits can show inter-individual variation. Here, we investigate whether red skin ornamentation, a rare example of a male mammalian trait involved in mate attraction, influences fecundity and is heritable in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), and explore the mechanisms that are involved in maintaining trait variation. Interestingly, the trait is expressed by and is attractive to both sexes. We collected facial images of 266 free-ranging individuals and modelled skin redness and darkness to rhesus macaque vision. We used 20 years of genetic parentage data to calculate selection gradients on the trait and perform heritability analyses. Results show that males who were both darkly coloured and high-ranking enjoyed higher fecundity. Female skin redness was positively linked to fecundity, although it remains unclear whether this influences male selectiveness. Heritability explained 10-15% of the variation in redness and darkness, and up to 30% for skin darkness when sexes are considered separately, suggesting sex-influenced inheritance. Our results suggest that inter-individual variation is maintained through condition-dependence, with an added effect of balancing selection on male skin darkness, providing rare evidence for a mammalian trait selected through inter-sexual selection.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 25 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 76 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 4%
United Kingdom 2 3%
Japan 2 3%
Romania 1 1%
Italy 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
France 1 1%
Unknown 64 84%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 22%
Researcher 14 18%
Student > Master 12 16%
Student > Bachelor 10 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 8%
Other 14 18%
Unknown 3 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 44 58%
Psychology 5 7%
Environmental Science 4 5%
Social Sciences 3 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Other 7 9%
Unknown 11 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 83. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 May 2020.
All research outputs
#261,796
of 15,792,176 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#758
of 8,215 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,826
of 211,593 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#17
of 148 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,792,176 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,215 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 32.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 211,593 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 148 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.