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Size-Dependent Reactivity of Magnetite Nanoparticles: A Field-Laboratory Comparison

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Technology, September 2014
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

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37 Mendeley
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Title
Size-Dependent Reactivity of Magnetite Nanoparticles: A Field-Laboratory Comparison
Published in
Environmental Science & Technology, September 2014
DOI 10.1021/es500172p
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew L. Swindle, Andrew S. Elwood Madden, Isabelle M. Cozzarelli, Mourad Benamara

Abstract

Logistic challenges make direct comparisons between laboratory- and field-based investigations into the size-dependent reactivity of nanomaterials difficult. This investigation sought to compare the size-dependent reactivity of nanoparticles in a field setting to a laboratory analog using the specific example of magnetite dissolution. Synthetic magnetite nanoparticles of three size intervals, ∼6 nm, ∼44 nm, and ∼90 nm were emplaced in the subsurface of the USGS research site at the Norman Landfill for up to 30 days using custom-made subsurface nanoparticle holders. Laboratory analog dissolution experiments were conducted using synthetic groundwater. Reaction products were analyzed via TEM and SEM and compared to initial particle characterizations. Field results indicated that an organic coating developed on the particle surfaces largely inhibiting reactivity. Limited dissolution occurred, with the amount of dissolution decreasing as particle size decreased. Conversely, the laboratory analogs without organics revealed greater dissolution of the smaller particles. These results showed that the presence of dissolved organics led to a nearly complete reversal in the size-dependent reactivity trends displayed between the field and laboratory experiments indicating that size-dependent trends observed in laboratory investigations may not be relevant in organic-rich natural systems.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Unknown 36 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 35%
Researcher 10 27%
Professor 4 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 5%
Other 2 5%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 2 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Chemistry 13 35%
Environmental Science 7 19%
Materials Science 4 11%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 8%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 4 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 October 2014.
All research outputs
#1,982,353
of 4,508,612 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Technology
#2,515
of 4,705 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#48,921
of 119,517 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Technology
#113
of 192 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,508,612 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 53rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,705 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 119,517 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 192 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.