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Antioxidant plasticity and thermal sensitivity in four types of Symbiodinium sp.

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Phycology, October 2014
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Title
Antioxidant plasticity and thermal sensitivity in four types of Symbiodinium sp.
Published in
Journal of Phycology, October 2014
DOI 10.1111/jpy.12232
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thomas Krueger, Susanne Becker, Stefanie Pontasch, Sophie Dove, Ove Hoegh-Guldberg, William Leggat, Paul L. Fisher, Simon K. Davy

Abstract

Warmer than average summer sea surface temperature is one of the main drivers for coral bleaching, which describes the loss of endosymbiotic dinoflagellates (genus: Symbiodinium) in reef-building corals. Past research has established that oxidative stress in the symbiont plays an important part in the bleaching cascade. Corals hosting different genotypes of Symbiodinium may have varying thermal bleaching thresholds, but changes in the symbiont's antioxidant system that may accompany these differences have received less attention. This study shows that constitutive activity and up-regulation of different parts of the antioxidant network under thermal stress differs between four Symbiodinium types in culture and that thermal susceptibility can be linked to glutathione redox homeostasis. In Symbiodinium B1, C1 and E, declining maximum quantum yield of PSII (Fv /Fm ) and death at 33°C were generally associated with elevated superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and a more oxidized glutathione pool. Symbiodinium F1 exhibited no decline in Fv /Fm or growth, but showed proportionally larger increases in ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity and glutathione content (GSx), while maintaining GSx in a reduced state. Depressed growth in Symbiodinium B1 at a sublethal temperature of 29°C was associated with transiently increased APX activity and glutathione pool size, and an overall increase in glutathione reductase (GR) activity. The collapse of GR activity at 33°C, together with increased SOD, APX and glutathione S-transferase activity, contributed to a strong oxidation of the glutathione pool with subsequent death. Integrating responses of multiple components of the antioxidant network highlights the importance of antioxidant plasticity in explaining type-specific temperature responses in Symbiodinium.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 64 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 2%
United Kingdom 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 61 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 31%
Researcher 13 20%
Student > Master 10 16%
Student > Bachelor 7 11%
Unspecified 3 5%
Other 11 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 36 56%
Environmental Science 7 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 11%
Unspecified 6 9%
Engineering 2 3%
Other 6 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 September 2014.
All research outputs
#9,864,005
of 12,354,050 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Phycology
#796
of 1,061 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#145,902
of 219,166 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Phycology
#7
of 8 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 1,061 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 4th percentile – i.e., 4% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.