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Crosstalk between glial and glioblastoma cells triggers the “go-or-grow” phenotype of tumor cells

Overview of attention for article published in Cell Communication and Signaling, October 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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41 Mendeley
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Title
Crosstalk between glial and glioblastoma cells triggers the “go-or-grow” phenotype of tumor cells
Published in
Cell Communication and Signaling, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12964-017-0194-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ana Isabel Oliveira, Sandra I. Anjo, Joana Vieira de Castro, Sofia C. Serra, António J. Salgado, Bruno Manadas, Bruno M. Costa

Abstract

Glioblastoma (GBM), the most malignant primary brain tumor, leads to poor and unpredictable clinical outcomes. Recent studies showed the tumor microenvironment has a critical role in regulating tumor growth by establishing a complex network of interactions with tumor cells. In this context, we investigated how GBM cells modulate resident glial cells, particularly their paracrine activity, and how this modulation can influence back on the malignant phenotype of GBM cells. Conditioned media (CM) of primary mouse glial cultures unexposed (unprimed) or exposed (primed) to the secretome of GL261 GBM cells were analyzed by proteomic analysis. Additionally, these CM were used in GBM cells to evaluate their impact in glioma cell viability, migration capacity and activation of tumor-related intracellular pathways. The proteomic analysis revealed that the pre-exposure of glial cells to CM from GBM cells led to the upregulation of several proteins related to inflammatory response, cell adhesion and extracellular structure organization within the secretome of primed glial cells. At the functional levels, CM derived from unprimed glial cells favored an increase in GBM cell migration capacity, while CM from primed glial cells promoted cells viability. These effects on GBM cells were accompanied by activation of particular intracellular cancer-related pathways, mainly the MAPK/ERK pathway, which is a known regulator of cell proliferation. Together, our results suggest that glial cells can impact on the pathophysiology of GBM tumors, and that the secretome of GBM cells is able to modulate the secretome of neighboring glial cells, in a way that regulates the "go-or-grow" phenotypic switch of GBM cells.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 41 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 27%
Student > Master 8 20%
Researcher 6 15%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Unspecified 4 10%
Other 8 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 34%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 15%
Neuroscience 5 12%
Unspecified 5 12%
Engineering 3 7%
Other 8 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 October 2017.
All research outputs
#6,669,321
of 11,911,448 outputs
Outputs from Cell Communication and Signaling
#85
of 251 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#124,884
of 273,945 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cell Communication and Signaling
#2
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,911,448 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 251 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,945 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.