↓ Skip to main content

Smoking and drinking behaviors of military spouses: Findings from the Millennium Cohort Family Study

Overview of attention for article published in Addictive Behaviors, February 2018
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
25 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Smoking and drinking behaviors of military spouses: Findings from the Millennium Cohort Family Study
Published in
Addictive Behaviors, February 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.addbeh.2017.09.015
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniel W. Trone, Teresa M. Powell, Lauren M. Bauer, Amber D. Seelig, Arthur V. Peterson, Alyson J. Littman, Emily C. Williams, Charles C. Maynard, Jonathan B. Bricker, Edward J. Boyko

Abstract

The associations between stressful military experiences and tobacco use and alcohol misuse among Service members are well documented. However, little is known about whether stressful military experiences are associated with tobacco use and alcohol misuse among military spouses. Using 9872 Service member-spouse dyads enrolled in the Millennium Cohort Family Study, we employed logistic regression to estimate the odds of self-reported cigarette smoking, risky drinking, and problem drinking among spouses by Service member deployment status, communication regarding deployment, and stress associated with military-related experiences, while adjusting for demographic, mental health, military experiences, and Service member military characteristics. Current cigarette smoking, risky drinking, and problem drinking were reported by 17.2%, 36.3%, and 7.3% of military spouses, respectively. Current deployment was not found to be associated with spousal smoking or drinking behaviors. Communication about deployment experiences with spouses was associated with lower odds of smoking, but not with risky or problem drinking. Spouses bothered by communicated deployment experiences and those who reported feeling very stressed by a combat-related deployment or duty assignment had consistently higher odds of both risky and problem drinking. Our findings suggest that contextual characteristics about the deployment experience, as well as the perceived stress of those experiences, may be more impactful than the simple fact of Service member deployment itself. These results suggest that considering the impact of deployment experiences on military spouses reveals important dimensions of military community adaptation and risk.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 24%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 16%
Unspecified 4 16%
Student > Master 3 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 12%
Other 5 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 28%
Psychology 6 24%
Unspecified 5 20%
Social Sciences 3 12%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 8%
Other 2 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 October 2017.
All research outputs
#9,820,064
of 12,295,315 outputs
Outputs from Addictive Behaviors
#2,177
of 2,808 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#201,068
of 276,666 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Addictive Behaviors
#85
of 121 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,295,315 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,808 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.7. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,666 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 121 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.