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Avian Reproduction

Overview of attention for book
Attention for Chapter 1: Avian Primordial Germ Cells
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (62nd percentile)

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Chapter title
Avian Primordial Germ Cells
Chapter number 1
Book title
Avian Reproduction
Published in
Advances in experimental medicine and biology, January 2017
DOI 10.1007/978-981-10-3975-1_1
Pubmed ID
Book ISBNs
978-9-81-103974-4, 978-9-81-103975-1
Authors

Takahiro Tagami, Daichi Miyahara, Yoshiaki Nakamura

Abstract

Germ cells transmit genetic information to the next generation through gametogenesis. Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are the first germ-cell population established during development, and are the common origins of both oocytes and spermatogonia. Unlike in other species, PGCs in birds undergo blood circulation to migrate toward the genital ridge, and are one of the major biological properties of avian PGCs. Germ cells enter meiosis and arrest at prophase I during embryogenesis in females, whereas in males they enter mitotic arrest during embryogenesis and enter meiosis only after birth. In chicken, gonadal sex differentiation occurs as early as embryonic day 6, but meiotic initiation of female germ cells starts from a relatively late stage (embryonic day 15.5). Retinoic acid controls meiotic entry in developing chicken gonads through the expressions of retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 2, a major retinoic acid synthesizing enzyme, and cytochrome P450 family 26, subfamily B member 1, a major retinoic acid-degrading enzyme. The other major biological property of avian PGCs is that they can be propagated in vitro for the long term, and this technique is useful for investigating proliferation mechanisms. The main factor involved in chicken PGC proliferation is fibroblast growth factor 2, which activates the signaling of MEK/ERK and thus promotes the cell cycle and anti-apoptosis. Furthermore, the activation of PI3K/Akt signaling is indispensable for the proliferation and survival of chicken PGCs.

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X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 26%
Researcher 7 17%
Student > Master 5 12%
Student > Bachelor 3 7%
Other 2 5%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 10 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 31%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 5%
Unspecified 1 2%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 15 36%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 October 2017.
All research outputs
#13,571,666
of 23,005,189 outputs
Outputs from Advances in experimental medicine and biology
#1,900
of 4,961 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#212,790
of 421,224 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Advances in experimental medicine and biology
#172
of 490 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,005,189 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,961 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 421,224 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 490 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.