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Air pollution exposure and lung function in highly exposed subjects in Beijing, China: a repeated-measure study

Overview of attention for article published in Particle and Fibre Toxicology, October 2014
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Title
Air pollution exposure and lung function in highly exposed subjects in Beijing, China: a repeated-measure study
Published in
Particle and Fibre Toxicology, October 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12989-014-0051-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrea A Baccarelli, Yinan Zheng, Xiao Zhang, Dou Chang, Lei Liu, Katherine Rose Wolf, Zhou Zhang, John P McCracken, Anaité Díaz, Pier Alberto Bertazzi, Joel Schwartz, Sheng Wang, Choong-Min Kang, Petros Koutrakis, Lifang Hou

Abstract

BackgroundExposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) has been associated with reduced lung function. Elemental components of PM have been suggested to have critical roles in PM toxicity, but their contribution to respiratory effects remains under-investigated. We evaluated the effects of traffic-related PM2.5 and its elemental components on lung function in two highly exposed groups of healthy adults in Beijing, China.MethodsThe Beijing Truck-Driver Air Pollution Study (BTDAS) included 60 truck drivers and 60 office workers evaluated in 2008. On two days separated by 1-2 weeks, we measured lung function at the end of the work day, personal PM2.5, and nine elemental components of PM2.5 during eight hours of work, i.e., elemental carbon (EC), potassium (K), sulfur (S), iron (Fe), silicon (Si), aluminum (Al), zinc (Zn), calcium (Ca), and titanium (Ti). We used covariate-adjusted mixed-effects models including PM2.5 as a covariate to estimate the percentage change in lung function associated with an inter-quartile range (IQR) exposure increase.ResultsThe two groups had high and overlapping exposure distributions with mean personal PM2.5 of 94.6 ¿g/m3 (IQR: 48.5-126.6) in office workers and 126.8 ¿g/m3 (IQR: 73.9-160.5) in truck drivers. The distributions of the nine elements showed group-specific profiles and generally higher levels in truck drivers. In all subjects combined, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) did not significantly correlate with PM2.5. However, FEV1 showed negative association with concentrations of four elements: Si (-3.07%, 95%CI: -5.00; -1.11, IQR: 1.54), Al (-2.88%, 95%CI: -4.91; -0.81, IQR: 0.86), Ca (-1.86%, 95%CI: -2.95; -0.76, IQR: 1.33), and Ti (-2.58%, 95%CI: -4.44; -0.68, IQR: 0.03), and FVC showed negative association with concentrations of three elements: Si (-3.23%, 95%CI: -5.61; -0.79), Al (-3.26%, 95%CI: -5.73; -0.72), and Ca (-1.86%, 95%CI: -3.23; -0.47). In stratified analysis, Si, Al, Ca, and Ti showed associations with lung function only among truck drivers, and no significant association among office workersConclusionSelected elemental components of PM2.5 showed effects on lung function that were not found in analyses of particle levels alone.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 103 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 102 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 20 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 17%
Researcher 14 14%
Other 6 6%
Student > Postgraduate 5 5%
Other 19 18%
Unknown 21 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 26 25%
Environmental Science 19 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 6%
Engineering 6 6%
Other 15 15%
Unknown 24 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 October 2014.
All research outputs
#20,010,843
of 22,489,892 outputs
Outputs from Particle and Fibre Toxicology
#460
of 556 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#189,901
of 226,645 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Particle and Fibre Toxicology
#1
of 1 outputs
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