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Linking functional response and bioenergetics to estimate juvenile salmon growth in a reservoir food web

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, October 2017
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3 tweeters

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2 Dimensions

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Title
Linking functional response and bioenergetics to estimate juvenile salmon growth in a reservoir food web
Published in
PLoS ONE, October 2017
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0185933
Pubmed ID
Authors

Craig A. Haskell, David A. Beauchamp, Stephen M. Bollens

Abstract

Juvenile salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) use of reservoir food webs is understudied. We examined the feeding behavior of subyearling Chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) and its relation to growth by estimating the functional response of juvenile salmon to changes in the density of Daphnia, an important component of reservoir food webs. We then estimated salmon growth across a broad range of water temperatures and daily rations of two primary prey, Daphnia and juvenile American shad (Alosa sapidissima) using a bioenergetics model. Laboratory feeding experiments yielded a Type-II functional response curve: C = 29.858 P *(4.271 + P)-1 indicating that salmon consumption (C) of Daphnia was not affected until Daphnia densities (P) were < 30 · L-1. Past field studies documented Daphnia densities in lower Columbia River reservoirs of < 3 · L-1 in July but as high as 40 · L-1 in August. Bioenergetics modeling indicated that subyearlings could not achieve positive growth above 22°C regardless of prey type or consumption rate. When feeding on Daphnia, subyearlings could not achieve positive growth above 20°C (water temperatures they commonly encounter in the lower Columbia River during summer). At 16-18°C, subyearlings had to consume about 27,000 Daphnia · day-1 to achieve positive growth. However, when feeding on juvenile American shad, subyearlings had to consume 20 shad · day-1 at 16-18°C, or at least 25 shad · day-1 at 20°C to achieve positive growth. Using empirical consumption rates and water temperatures from summer 2013, subyearlings exhibited negative growth during July (-0.23 to -0.29 g · d-1) and August (-0.05 to -0.07 g · d-1). By switching prey from Daphnia to juvenile shad which have a higher energy density, subyearlings can partially compensate for the effects of higher water temperatures they experience in the lower Columbia River during summer. However, achieving positive growth as piscivores requires subyearlings to feed at higher consumption rates than they exhibited empirically. While our results indicate compromised growth in reservoir habitats, the long-term repercussions to salmon populations in the Columbia River Basin are unknown.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 26%
Researcher 5 22%
Unspecified 4 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 17%
Student > Bachelor 1 4%
Other 3 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 9 39%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 35%
Unspecified 4 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Decision Sciences 1 4%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 October 2017.
All research outputs
#6,908,695
of 12,009,062 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#67,625
of 131,470 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#131,768
of 274,085 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#1,425
of 2,604 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,009,062 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 131,470 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.6. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,085 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2,604 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.