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Halal and kosher slaughter methods and meat quality: A review

Overview of attention for article published in Meat Science, November 2014
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Mentioned by

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1 tweeter
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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53 Dimensions

Readers on

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233 Mendeley
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Title
Halal and kosher slaughter methods and meat quality: A review
Published in
Meat Science, November 2014
DOI 10.1016/j.meatsci.2014.05.021
Pubmed ID
Authors

M.M. Farouk, H.M. Al-Mazeedi, A.B. Sabow, A.E.D. Bekhit, K.D. Adeyemi, A.Q. Sazili, A. Ghani

Abstract

There are many slaughter procedures that religions and cultures use around the world. The two that are commercially relevant are the halal and kosher methods practiced by Muslims and Jews respectively. The global trade in red meat and poultry produced using these two methods is substantial, thus the importance of the quality of the meat produced using the methods. Halal and kosher slaughter per se should not affect meat quality more than their industrial equivalents, however, some of their associated pre- and post-slaughter processes do. For instance, the slow decline in blood pressure following a halal pre-slaughter head-only stun and neck cut causes blood splash (ecchymosis) in a range of muscles and organs of slaughtered livestock. Other quality concerns include bruising, hemorrhages, skin discoloration and broken bones particularly in poultry. In addition to these conventional quality issues, the "spiritual quality" of the meat can also be affected when the halal and kosher religious requirements are not fully met during the slaughter process. The nature, causes, importance and mitigations of these and other quality issues related to halal and kosher slaughtering and meat production using these methods are the subjects of this review.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 233 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Malaysia 6 3%
Mexico 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Nigeria 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Indonesia 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 216 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 59 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 47 20%
Student > Bachelor 35 15%
Researcher 21 9%
Unspecified 17 7%
Other 54 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 76 33%
Unspecified 27 12%
Social Sciences 24 10%
Engineering 20 9%
Business, Management and Accounting 16 7%
Other 70 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 July 2019.
All research outputs
#8,048,343
of 13,366,323 outputs
Outputs from Meat Science
#603
of 1,018 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#100,452
of 213,475 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Meat Science
#15
of 23 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,366,323 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,018 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 213,475 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.