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The relationship between single and two-dimensional indices of left ventricular size using hemodynamic transesophageal echocardiography in trauma and burn patients

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Ultrasound Journal, October 2017
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)

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5 tweeters
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Title
The relationship between single and two-dimensional indices of left ventricular size using hemodynamic transesophageal echocardiography in trauma and burn patients
Published in
Critical Ultrasound Journal, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13089-017-0074-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Duraid Younan, T. Mark Beasley, David C. Pigott, C. Blayke Gibson, John P. Gullett, Jeffrey Richey, Jean-Francois Pittet, Ahmed Zaky

Abstract

Conventional echocardiographic technique for assessment of volume status and cardiac contractility utilizes left ventricular end-diastolic area (LVEDA) and fractional area of change (FAC), respectively. Our goal was to find a technically reliable yet faster technique to evaluate volume status and contractility by measuring left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDD) and fractional shortening (FS) in a cohort of mechanically ventilated trauma and burn patients using hemodynamic transesophageal echocardiographic (hTEE) monitoring. Retrospective chart review performed at trauma/burn intensive care unit (TBICU). Data on 88 mechanically ventilated surgical intensive care patients cared for between July 2013 and July 2015 were reviewed. Initial measurements of LVEDA, left ventricular end-systolic area (LVESA) and FAC were collected. Post-processing left ventricular end-systolic (LVESD) and end-diastolic diameters (LVEDD) were measured and fractional shortening (FS) was calculated. Two orthogonal measurements of LV diameter were obtained in transverse (Tr) and posteroanterior (PA) orientation. There was a significant correlation between transverse and posteroanterior left ventricular diameter measurements in both systole and diastole. In systole, r = 0.92, p < 0.01 for LVESD-Tr (mean 23.47 mm, SD ± 6.77) and LVESD-PA (mean 24.84 mm, SD = 8.23). In diastole, r = 0.80, p < 0.01 for LVEDD-Tr (mean 37.60 mm, SD ± 6.45), and LVEDD-PA diameters (mean 42.24 mm, SD ± 7.97). Left ventricular area (LVEDA) also significantly correlated with left ventricular diameter LVEDD-Tr (r = 0.84, p < 0.01) and LVEDD-PA (r = 0.90, p < 0.01). Both transverse and PA measurements of fractional shortening were significantly (p < 0.0001) and similarly correlated with systolic function as measured by FAC. Bland-Altman analyses also indicated that the assessment of fractional shortening using left ventricular posteroanterior diameter measurement shows agreement with FAC. Left ventricular diameter measurements are a reliable and technically feasible alternative to left ventricular area measurements in the assessment of cardiac filling and systolic function.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 8 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 38%
Professor 2 25%
Student > Bachelor 1 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 13%
Unknown 1 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 50%
Unspecified 1 13%
Engineering 1 13%
Unknown 2 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 January 2018.
All research outputs
#3,278,052
of 12,406,706 outputs
Outputs from Critical Ultrasound Journal
#107
of 172 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#87,106
of 276,738 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Ultrasound Journal
#8
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,406,706 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 172 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.2. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,738 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.