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Understanding the needs of professionals who provide psychosocial care for children and adults with disorders of sex development

Overview of attention for article published in BMJ Paediatrics Open, August 2017
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Title
Understanding the needs of professionals who provide psychosocial care for children and adults with disorders of sex development
Published in
BMJ Paediatrics Open, August 2017
DOI 10.1136/bmjpo-2017-000132
Pubmed ID
Authors

Arianne Dessens, Guilherme Guaragna-Filho, Andreas Kyriakou, Jillian Bryce, Caroline Sanders, Agneta Nordenskjöld, Marta Rozas, Violeta Iotova, Annastasia Ediati, Anders Juul, Maciej Krawczynski, Olaf Hiort, S Faisal Ahmed

Abstract

Disorders in sex development (DSD) can be treated well medically, but families will encounter many psychosocial challenges. Promoting counselling to facilitate acceptance and coping is important yet equality of access is unknown. This study investigated the modalities of psychosocial care provided in centres of DSD care. An international survey conducted among 93 providers of psychosocial care, identified through clinical networks, registries and professional forums. Forty-six respondents from 22 different countries filled out the survey (49%). Most respondents (78%) were based in hospital-based expert teams. Referrals came from paediatric endocrinologists (76%), gynaecologists (39%) and paediatric urologists (37%). Psychological counselling was most frequently given to parents (74%), followed by children (39%), adolescents (37%) and adults (11%) and was most frequently focused on coping and acceptance of DSD (54%), education (52%), the atypical body (39%) and genital (41%), decisions on genital surgery (33%), complications with sexual intercourse (29%), disclosure (28%) and acceptance of infertility (11%). Respondents most frequently observed DSD related confusion about gender (54%), acceptance of cross gender behaviour (50%), anxiety (43%) and sadness and depression (38%). Most psychosocial care is provided to parents. It is assumed that parental support is important as acceptance is conditional to become affectionate caretakers. Although it may be more difficult for youngsters to communicate about their condition and treatment, providing opportunity to bring up issues that are important for them, is imperative. Clinicians and parents should be aware that parental and patients' interests may not correspond completely. Psychosocial management should also include transition and adult care.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 7 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 43%
Unknown 4 57%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 2 29%
Unspecified 1 14%
Unknown 4 57%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 October 2017.
All research outputs
#9,520,701
of 11,918,812 outputs
Outputs from BMJ Paediatrics Open
#77
of 91 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#200,575
of 274,794 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMJ Paediatrics Open
#27
of 34 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,918,812 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 91 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.2. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,794 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 34 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.