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Modeling host-seeking behavior of African malaria vector mosquitoes in the presence of long-lasting insecticidal nets

Overview of attention for article published in Mathematical Biosciences, January 2018
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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51 Mendeley
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Title
Modeling host-seeking behavior of African malaria vector mosquitoes in the presence of long-lasting insecticidal nets
Published in
Mathematical Biosciences, January 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.mbs.2017.10.005
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anna Shcherbacheva, Heikki Haario, Gerry F. Killeen

Abstract

The efficiency of spatial repellents and long-lasting insecticide-treated nets (LLINs) is a key research topic in malaria control. Insecticidal nets reduce the mosquito-human contact rate and simultaneously decrease mosquito populations. However, LLINs demonstrate dissimilar efficiency against different species of malaria mosquitoes. Various factors have been proposed as an explanation, including differences in insecticide-induced mortality, flight characteristics, or persistence of attack. Here we present a discrete agent-based approach that enables the efficiency of LLINs, baited traps and Insecticide Residual Sprays (IRS) to be examined. The model is calibrated with hut-level experimental data to compare the efficiency of protection against two mosquito species: Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles arabiensis. We show that while such data does not allow an unambiguous identification of the details of how LLINs alter the vector behavior, the model calibrations quantify the overall impact of LLINs for the two different mosquito species. The simulations are generalized to community-scale scenarios that systematically demonstrate the lower efficiency of the LLINs in control of An. Arabiensis compared to An. gambiae.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 51 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 29%
Student > Bachelor 7 14%
Researcher 6 12%
Student > Master 4 8%
Librarian 2 4%
Other 6 12%
Unknown 11 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 16%
Environmental Science 3 6%
Engineering 2 4%
Computer Science 2 4%
Other 14 27%
Unknown 13 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 October 2017.
All research outputs
#7,663,288
of 12,263,344 outputs
Outputs from Mathematical Biosciences
#250
of 528 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#162,092
of 287,544 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Mathematical Biosciences
#7
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,263,344 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 528 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.2. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 287,544 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.