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Associations of active commuting with body fat and visceral adipose tissue: A cross-sectional population based study in the UK

Overview of attention for article published in Preventive Medicine, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (67th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
19 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
58 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
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Title
Associations of active commuting with body fat and visceral adipose tissue: A cross-sectional population based study in the UK
Published in
Preventive Medicine, January 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.10.017
Pubmed ID
Authors

Oliver T. Mytton, David Ogilvie, Simon Griffin, Søren Brage, Nick Wareham, Jenna Panter

Abstract

The promotion of active travel (walking and cycling) is one promising approach to prevent the development of obesity and related cardio-metabolic disease. However the associations between active travel and adiposity remain uncertain. We used the Fenland study (a population based-cohort study; Cambridgeshire, UK, 2005-15) to describe the association of commuting means with DEXA measured body fat and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) among commuters (aged 29-65years; n=7680). We stratified our sample into those living near (within five miles) and far (five miles or further) from work, and categorised commuting means differently for each group reflecting their different travel options. Associations were adjusted for age, education, Mediterranean diet score, smoking, alcohol consumption, test site and either self-reported physical activity or objective physical activity. Among those living near to work, people who reported regularly cycling to work had lower body fat than those who only used the car (adjusting for self-reported physical activity: women, -1.74%, 95% CI: -2.27% to -0.76%; men, -1.30%, -2.26% to -0.33%). Among those who lived far from work, people who reported regular car-use with active travel had lower body fat (women; -1.18%, 95% CI: -2.23% to -0.13%; men, -1.19%, -1.93% to -0.44%). Findings were similar for VAT and when adjusting for objectively measured physical activity instead of self-reported physical activity. In conclusion, active commuting may reduce adiposity and help prevent related cardio-metabolic disease. If people live too far from work to walk or cycle the whole journey, incorporating some active travel within the commute is also beneficial.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 19 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 58 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 57 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 21%
Student > Master 8 14%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Researcher 5 9%
Student > Postgraduate 4 7%
Other 12 21%
Unknown 11 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 10%
Sports and Recreations 6 10%
Social Sciences 3 5%
Psychology 2 3%
Other 7 12%
Unknown 19 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 August 2020.
All research outputs
#1,680,898
of 15,839,310 outputs
Outputs from Preventive Medicine
#800
of 3,762 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#51,197
of 323,271 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Preventive Medicine
#29
of 88 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,839,310 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,762 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 323,271 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 88 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.