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Potential biomarkers for the clinical prognosis of severe dengue

Overview of attention for article published in Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, September 2013
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Title
Potential biomarkers for the clinical prognosis of severe dengue
Published in
Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, September 2013
DOI 10.1590/0074-0276108062013012
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mayara Marques Carneiro da Silva, Laura Helena Vega Gonzales Gil, Ernesto Torres de Azevedo Marques Junior, Carlos Eduardo Calzavara-Silva

Abstract

Currently, several assays can confirm acute dengue infection at the point-of-care. However, none of these assays can predict the severity of the disease symptoms. A prognosis test that predicts the likelihood of a dengue patient to develop a severe form of the disease could permit more efficient patient triage and treatment. We hypothesise that mRNA expression of apoptosis and innate immune response-related genes will be differentially regulated during the early stages of dengue and might predict the clinical outcome. Aiming to identify biomarkers for dengue prognosis, we extracted mRNA from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of mild and severe dengue patients during the febrile stage of the disease to measure the expression levels of selected genes by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The selected candidate biomarkers were previously identified by our group as differentially expressed in microarray studies. We verified that the mRNA coding for CFD, MAGED1, PSMB9, PRDX4 and FCGR3B were differentially expressed between patients who developed clinical symptoms associated with the mild type of dengue and patients who showed clinical symptoms associated with severe dengue. We suggest that this gene expression panel could putatively serve as biomarkers for the clinical prognosis of dengue haemorrhagic fever.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 71 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 1%
Vietnam 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Mexico 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 66 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 13 18%
Researcher 12 17%
Student > Master 9 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 8%
Other 12 17%
Unknown 13 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 27%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 7%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 4%
Other 8 11%
Unknown 16 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 October 2014.
All research outputs
#3,408,196
of 4,353,686 outputs
Outputs from Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz
#275
of 420 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#90,567
of 117,968 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz
#20
of 29 outputs
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