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Critical role for resource constraints in neural models.

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience, August 2014
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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28 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Critical role for resource constraints in neural models.
Published in
Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience, August 2014
DOI 10.3389/fnsys.2014.00154
Pubmed ID
Authors

James A Roberts, Kartik K Iyer, Sampsa Vanhatalo, Michael Breakspear, Roberts JA, Iyer KK, Vanhatalo S, Breakspear M, James A. Roberts, Kartik K. Iyer, Roberts, James A., Iyer, Kartik K., Vanhatalo, Sampsa, Breakspear, Michael

Abstract

Criticality has emerged as a leading dynamical candidate for healthy and pathological neuronal activity. At the heart of criticality in neural systems is the need for parameters to be tuned to specific values or for the existence of self-organizing mechanisms. Existing models lack precise physiological descriptions for how the brain maintains its tuning near a critical point. In this paper we argue that a key ingredient missing from the field is a formulation of reciprocal coupling between neural activity and metabolic resources. We propose that the constraint of optimizing the balance between energy use and activity plays a major role in tuning brain states to lie near criticality. Important recent findings aligned with our viewpoint have emerged from analyses of disorders that involve severe metabolic disturbances and alter scale-free properties of brain dynamics, including burst suppression. Moreover, we argue that average shapes of neuronal avalanches are a signature of scale-free activity that offers sharper insights into underlying mechanisms than afforded by traditional analyses of avalanche statistics.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 7%
Finland 1 4%
Unknown 25 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 18%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 18%
Student > Master 3 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 7%
Other 7 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 29%
Neuroscience 5 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 11%
Unspecified 3 11%
Psychology 3 11%
Other 6 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 October 2014.
All research outputs
#8,787,332
of 11,411,632 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience
#667
of 846 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#128,017
of 205,890 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience
#42
of 53 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,411,632 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 846 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.3. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 205,890 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 53 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.