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Seizures and Sleep in the Thalamus: Focal Limbic Seizures Show Divergent Activity Patterns in Different Thalamic Nuclei

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neuroscience, October 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

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Title
Seizures and Sleep in the Thalamus: Focal Limbic Seizures Show Divergent Activity Patterns in Different Thalamic Nuclei
Published in
Journal of Neuroscience, October 2017
DOI 10.1523/jneurosci.1011-17.2017
Pubmed ID
Authors

Li Feng, Joshua E. Motelow, Chanthia Ma, William Biche, Cian McCafferty, Nicholas Smith, Mengran Liu, Qiong Zhan, Ruonan Jia, Bo Xiao, Alvaro Duque, Hal Blumenfeld

Abstract

The thalamus plays diverse roles in cortical-subcortical brain activity patterns. Recent work suggests that focal temporal lobe seizures depress subcortical arousal systems and convert cortical activity into a pattern resembling slow wave sleep. The potential simultaneous and paradoxical role of the thalamus in both limbic seizure propagation, and in sleep-like cortical rhythms has not been investigated. We recorded neuronal activity from the central lateral (CL), anterior (ANT) and ventral posteromedial (VPM) nuclei of the thalamus in an established female rat model of focal limbic seizures. We found that population firing of neurons in CL decreased during seizures while the cortex exhibited slow waves. In contrast, ANT showed a trend towards increased neuronal firing compatible with polyspike seizure discharges seen in the hippocampus. Meanwhile, VPM exhibited a remarkable increase in sleep spindles during focal seizures. Single unit juxtacellular recordings from CL demonstrated reduced overall firing rates, but a switch in firing pattern from single spikes to burst firing during seizures. These findings suggest that different thalamic nuclei play very different roles in focal limbic seizures. While limbic nuclei such as ANT appear to participate directly in seizure propagation, arousal nuclei such as CL may contribute to depressed cortical function, whereas sleep spindles in relay nuclei such as VPM may interrupt thalamocortical information flow. These combined effects could be critical for controlling both seizure severity and impairment of consciousness. Further understanding of differential effects of seizures on different thalamocortical networks may lead to improved treatments directly targeting these modes of impaired function.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTTemporal lobe epilepsy has a major negative impact on quality of life. Previous work suggests that the thalamus plays a critical role in thalamocortical network modulation and subcortical arousal maintenance, but its precise seizure-associated functions are not known. We recorded neuronal activity in three different thalamic regions and found divergent activity patterns which may respectively participate in seizure propagation, impaired level of conscious arousal, and altered relay of information to the cortex during focal limbic seizures. These very different activity patterns within the thalamus may help explain why focal temporal lobe seizures often disrupt widespread network function, and can help guide future treatments aimed at restoring normal thalamocortical network activity and cognition.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 95 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 95 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 17%
Researcher 13 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 9%
Student > Bachelor 9 9%
Student > Master 8 8%
Other 18 19%
Unknown 22 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 24 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 18 19%
Psychology 5 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 4%
Unspecified 3 3%
Other 11 12%
Unknown 30 32%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 November 2017.
All research outputs
#4,805,073
of 23,577,654 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neuroscience
#7,586
of 23,491 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#84,617
of 329,089 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neuroscience
#120
of 282 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,577,654 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 79th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 23,491 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 329,089 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 282 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.