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Taxonomic and functional turnover are decoupled in European peat bogs

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, October 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
9 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
72 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
79 Mendeley
Title
Taxonomic and functional turnover are decoupled in European peat bogs
Published in
Nature Communications, October 2017
DOI 10.1038/s41467-017-01350-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bjorn J. M. Robroek, Vincent E. J. Jassey, Richard J. Payne, Magalí Martí, Luca Bragazza, Albert Bleeker, Alexandre Buttler, Simon J. M. Caporn, Nancy B. Dise, Jens Kattge, Katarzyna Zając, Bo H. Svensson, Jasper van Ruijven, Jos T. A. Verhoeven

Abstract

In peatland ecosystems, plant communities mediate a globally significant carbon store. The effects of global environmental change on plant assemblages are expected to be a factor in determining how ecosystem functions such as carbon uptake will respond. Using vegetation data from 56 Sphagnum-dominated peat bogs across Europe, we show that in these ecosystems plant species aggregate into two major clusters that are each defined by shared response to environmental conditions. Across environmental gradients, we find significant taxonomic turnover in both clusters. However, functional identity and functional redundancy of the community as a whole remain unchanged. This strongly suggests that in peat bogs, species turnover across environmental gradients is restricted to functionally similar species. Our results demonstrate that plant taxonomic and functional turnover are decoupled, which may allow these peat bogs to maintain ecosystem functioning when subject to future environmental change.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 72 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 79 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 79 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 27%
Unspecified 15 19%
Student > Master 14 18%
Researcher 10 13%
Student > Bachelor 7 9%
Other 12 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 27 34%
Environmental Science 23 29%
Unspecified 18 23%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 6 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Other 3 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 114. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 October 2018.
All research outputs
#138,085
of 13,589,098 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#2,373
of 24,590 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,642
of 316,430 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#243
of 2,117 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,589,098 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 24,590 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 47.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 316,430 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2,117 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.