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Genome sequence of a 45,000-year-old modern human from western Siberia

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, October 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Citations

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452 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
783 Mendeley
citeulike
5 CiteULike
Title
Genome sequence of a 45,000-year-old modern human from western Siberia
Published in
Nature, October 2014
DOI 10.1038/nature13810
Pubmed ID
Authors

Qiaomei Fu, Heng Li, Priya Moorjani, Flora Jay, Sergey M. Slepchenko, Aleksei A. Bondarev, Philip L. F. Johnson, Ayinuer Aximu-Petri, Kay Prüfer, Cesare de Filippo, Matthias Meyer, Nicolas Zwyns, Domingo C. Salazar-García, Yaroslav V. Kuzmin, Susan G. Keates, Pavel A. Kosintsev, Dmitry I. Razhev, Michael P. Richards, Nikolai V. Peristov, Michael Lachmann, Katerina Douka, Thomas F. G. Higham, Montgomery Slatkin, Jean-Jacques Hublin, David Reich, Janet Kelso, T. Bence Viola, Svante Pääbo

Abstract

We present the high-quality genome sequence of a ∼45,000-year-old modern human male from Siberia. This individual derives from a population that lived before-or simultaneously with-the separation of the populations in western and eastern Eurasia and carries a similar amount of Neanderthal ancestry as present-day Eurasians. However, the genomic segments of Neanderthal ancestry are substantially longer than those observed in present-day individuals, indicating that Neanderthal gene flow into the ancestors of this individual occurred 7,000-13,000 years before he lived. We estimate an autosomal mutation rate of 0.4 × 10(-9) to 0.6 × 10(-9) per site per year, a Y chromosomal mutation rate of 0.7 × 10(-9) to 0.9 × 10(-9) per site per year based on the additional substitutions that have occurred in present-day non-Africans compared to this genome, and a mitochondrial mutation rate of 1.8 × 10(-8) to 3.2 × 10(-8) per site per year based on the age of the bone.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 783 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 14 2%
Germany 10 1%
United Kingdom 7 <1%
Spain 4 <1%
France 3 <1%
China 3 <1%
Mexico 3 <1%
Canada 3 <1%
Portugal 2 <1%
Other 16 2%
Unknown 718 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 207 26%
Researcher 147 19%
Student > Bachelor 112 14%
Student > Master 91 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 38 5%
Other 133 17%
Unknown 55 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 315 40%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 141 18%
Arts and Humanities 71 9%
Social Sciences 58 7%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 26 3%
Other 98 13%
Unknown 74 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 999. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 January 2020.
All research outputs
#4,412
of 14,123,595 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#712
of 71,412 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#61
of 232,831 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#19
of 966 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,123,595 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 71,412 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 78.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 232,831 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 966 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.