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Radiographic characteristics in congenital scoliosis associated with split cord malformation: a retrospective study of 266 surgical cases

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, October 2017
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Title
Radiographic characteristics in congenital scoliosis associated with split cord malformation: a retrospective study of 266 surgical cases
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12891-017-1782-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fan Feng, Haining Tan, Xingye Li, Chong Chen, Zheng Li, Jianguo Zhang, Jianxiong Shen

Abstract

Vertebrae, ribs, and spinal cord are anatomically adjacent structures, and their close relationships are clinically important for planning better corrective surgical approach. The objective is to identify the radiographic characteristics in surgical patients with congenital scoliosis (CS) and coexisting split cord malformation (SCM). A total of 266 patients with CS and SCM underwent surgical treatment at our hospital between May 2000 and December 2015 was retrospectively identified. The demographic distribution and radiographic data were collected to investigate the characteristics of spine curve, vertebral, rib, and intraspinal anomalies. According to Pang's classification, all patients were divided into two groups: type I group is defined as two hemicords, each within a separate dural tube separated by a bony or cartilaginous medial spur, while type II group is defined as two hemicords within a single dural tube separated by a nonrigid fibrous septum. There were 104 patients (39.1%) in Type I group and 162 patients (60.9%) in Type II group. SCM was most commonly found in the lower thoracic and lumbar regions. The mean length of the septum in Type I SCM was significantly shorter than Type II SCM (2.7 vs. 5.2 segments). Patients in Type I group had a higher proportion of kyphotic deformity (22.1%). The vertebral deformities were simple in only 16.5% and multiple in 83.5% of 266 cases. Patients in Type I group presented higher prevalence of multiple (90.4%) and extensive (5.1 segments) malformation of vertebrae. In addition, hypertrophic lamina and bulbous spinous processes were more frequent in Type I group (29.7%), even developing into the "volcano-shape" deformities. Rib anomalies occurred in 62.8% of all patients and 46.1% of them were complex anomalies. The overall prevalence of other intraspinal anomalies was 42.9%. The most common coexisting intraspinal anomalies was syringomyelia (30.5%). The current study, with the largest cohort to date, demonstrated that patients with CS and coexisting SCM presented high prevalence of multiple vertebral deformities, rib and intraspinal anomalies. The length of the split segment in Type I SCM was shorter than that in Type II SCM. Compared with Type II SCM, patients with Type I SCM presented with higher incidence of kyphotic deformity, more extensive and complicated vertebral anomalies, and more complex rib anomalies.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 2 17%
Researcher 2 17%
Professor 1 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 8%
Student > Master 1 8%
Other 3 25%
Unknown 2 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 50%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 8%
Engineering 1 8%
Unknown 4 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 November 2017.
All research outputs
#6,953,947
of 12,098,562 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1,267
of 2,410 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#136,041
of 284,638 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#66
of 135 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,098,562 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,410 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,638 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 135 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.