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Why don't poor men eat fruit? Socioeconomic differences in motivations for fruit consumption

Overview of attention for article published in Appetite, January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (68th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
22 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
125 Mendeley
Title
Why don't poor men eat fruit? Socioeconomic differences in motivations for fruit consumption
Published in
Appetite, January 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2014.10.022
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rachel Pechey, Pablo Monsivais, Yin-Lam Ng, Theresa M. Marteau

Abstract

Background: Those of lower socioeconomic status (SES) tend to have less healthy diets than those of higher SES. This study aimed to assess whether differences in motivations for particular foods might contribute to socioeconomic differences in consumption. Methods: Participants (n = 732) rated their frequency of consumption and explicit liking of fruit, cake and cheese. They reported eating motivations (e.g., health, hunger, price) and related attributes of the investigated foods (healthiness, expected satiety, value for money). Participants were randomly assigned to an implicit liking task (Single Category Implicit Association Task) for one food category. Analyses were conducted separately for different SES measures (income, education, occupational group). Results: Lower SES and male participants reported eating less fruit, but no SES differences were found for cheese or cake. Analyses therefore focused on fruit. In implicit liking analyses, results (for income and education) reflected patterning in consumption, with lower SES and male participants liking fruit less. In explicit liking analyses, no differences were found by SES. Higher SES participants (all indicators) were more likely to report health and weight control and less likely report price as motivators of food choices. For perceptions of fruit, no SES-based differences were found in healthiness whilst significant interactions (but not main effects) were found (for income and education) for expected satiety and value for money. Neither liking nor perceptions of fruit were found to mediate the relationship between SES and frequency of fruit consumption. Conclusions: There is evidence for social patterning in food motivation, but differences are modified by the choice of implicit or explicit measures. Further work should clarify the extent to which these motivations may be contributing to the social and gender patterning in diet.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 22 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 125 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 2%
United States 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
New Zealand 1 <1%
Unknown 119 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 26 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 19%
Student > Master 22 18%
Unspecified 14 11%
Researcher 13 10%
Other 26 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 21 17%
Psychology 20 16%
Social Sciences 17 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 16 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 14 11%
Other 37 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 July 2017.
All research outputs
#972,771
of 12,528,478 outputs
Outputs from Appetite
#723
of 2,995 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#21,741
of 229,842 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Appetite
#27
of 87 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,528,478 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,995 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 229,842 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 87 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.