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Effects of pituitary-specific overexpression of FSHα/β on reproductive traits in transgenic boars

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology, October 2017
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Title
Effects of pituitary-specific overexpression of FSHα/β on reproductive traits in transgenic boars
Published in
Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40104-017-0208-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wenting Li, Yujun Quan, Mengmeng Zhang, Kejun Wang, Muzhen Zhu, Ye Chen, Qiuyan Li, Keliang Wu

Abstract

Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) is a gonadotropin synthesized and secreted by the pituitary gland. FSH stimulates follicle development and maturation in females. It also plays an important role in spermatogenesis in males, including humans and mice. However, the effects of FSH on male pigs are largely unknown. In this study, we generated transgenic pigs to investigate the effects of FSHα/β overexpression on reproductive traits in boars. After five transgenic F0 founders were crossed with wide-type pigs, 193 F1 animals were obtained. Of these, 96 were confirmed as transgenic. FSHα and FSHβ mRNAs were detected only in pituitary tissue. Transgenic boars exhibited significantly higher levels of FSHα and FSHβ mRNA, serum FSH, and serum testosterone, compared to full-sib non-transgenic boars. Significant increases in testis weight, vas deferens diameter, seminiferous tubule diameter, and the number of Leydig cells were observed, suggesting that the exogenous FSHα/β affects reproductive traits. Finally, transgenic and non-transgenic boars had similar growth performance and biochemical profiles. Pituitary-specific overexpression of FSHα/β genes is likely to impact reproductive traits positively, as indicated by enhancements in serum testosterone level, testis weight, the development of vas deferens, seminiferous tubules, and Leydig cells in transgenic boars. A high level of serum FSH induces secretion of serum testosterone, possibly by boosting the number of Leydig cells, which presumably increases the libido and the frequency of sexual activity in transgenic boars. Our study provides a preliminary foundation for the genetic improvement of reproductive traits in male pigs.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 2 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 2 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 1 50%
Student > Master 1 50%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 100%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 November 2017.
All research outputs
#7,877,603
of 12,554,960 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology
#133
of 273 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#179,485
of 313,708 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology
#30
of 60 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,554,960 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 273 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.5. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 60 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.