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Wind causes Totten Ice Shelf melt and acceleration

Overview of attention for article published in Science Advances, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
19 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
120 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
wikipedia
7 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
69 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
connotea
1 Connotea
Title
Wind causes Totten Ice Shelf melt and acceleration
Published in
Science Advances, November 2017
DOI 10.1126/sciadv.1701681
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chad A. Greene, Donald D. Blankenship, David E. Gwyther, Alessandro Silvano, Esmee van Wijk

Abstract

Totten Glacier in East Antarctica has the potential to raise global sea level by at least 3.5 m, but its sensitivity to climate change has not been well understood. The glacier is coupled to the ocean by the Totten Ice Shelf, which has exhibited variable speed, thickness, and grounding line position in recent years. To understand the drivers of this interannual variability, we compare ice velocity to oceanic wind stress and find a consistent pattern of ice-shelf acceleration 19 months after upwelling anomalies occur at the continental shelf break nearby. The sensitivity to climate forcing we observe is a response to wind-driven redistribution of oceanic heat and is independent of large-scale warming of the atmosphere or ocean. Our results establish a link between the stability of Totten Glacier and upwelling near the East Antarctic coast, where surface winds are projected to intensify over the next century as a result of increasing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 120 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 69 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Unknown 68 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 33%
Researcher 19 28%
Student > Master 10 14%
Unspecified 7 10%
Student > Bachelor 3 4%
Other 7 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 40 58%
Unspecified 10 14%
Environmental Science 6 9%
Physics and Astronomy 5 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 6%
Other 4 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 242. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 September 2018.
All research outputs
#44,380
of 12,371,951 outputs
Outputs from Science Advances
#317
of 2,459 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,502
of 295,671 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science Advances
#23
of 179 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,371,951 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,459 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 126.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 295,671 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 179 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.