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Secretion of ferritin by iron-laden macrophages and influence of lipoproteins.

Overview of attention for article published in Free Radical Research, January 2004
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

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1 tweeter

Citations

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13 Mendeley
Title
Secretion of ferritin by iron-laden macrophages and influence of lipoproteins.
Published in
Free Radical Research, January 2004
DOI 10.1080/10715760400011692
Pubmed ID
Abstract

Increasing evidence supports a role of cellular iron in the initiation and development of atherosclerosis. We and others reported earlier that iron-laden macrophages are associated with LDL oxidation, angiogenesis, nitric oxide production and apoptosis in atherosclerotic processes. Here we have further studied perturbed iron metabolism in macrophages, their interaction with lipoproteins and the origin of iron accumulation in human atheroma. In both early and advanced human atheroma lesions, hemoglobin and ferritin accumulation correlated with the macrophage-rich areas. Iron uptake into macrophages, via transferrin receptors or scavenger receptor-mediated erythrophagocytosis, increased cellular iron and accelerated ferritin synthesis at both mRNA and protein levels. The binding activity of iron regulatory proteins was enhanced by desferrioxamine (DFO) and decreased by hemin and iron compounds. Iron-laden macrophages exocytosed both iron and ferritin into the culture medium. Exposure to oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL, >or=50 microg/mL) resulted in <20% apoptosis of iron-laden human macrophages, but cells remained impermeable after a 24 h period and an increased excretion of ferritin could be observed by immunostaining techniques. Exposure to high-density lipoprotein (HDL) significantly decreased ferritin excretion from these cells. We conclude: (i) erythrophagocytosis and hemoglobin catabolism by macrophages contribute to ferritin accumulation in human atherosclerotic lesions and; (ii) iron uptake into macrophages leads to increased synthesis and secretion of ferritin; (iii) oxidized LDL and HDL have different effects on these processes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 15%
Unknown 11 85%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 38%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Other 2 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 38%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 15%
Unspecified 1 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 8%
Other 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 October 2014.
All research outputs
#3,070,071
of 4,509,149 outputs
Outputs from Free Radical Research
#177
of 612 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#83,426
of 124,844 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Free Radical Research
#8
of 31 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,509,149 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 612 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 124,844 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 31 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.