↓ Skip to main content

Characterization of a thalamic nucleus mediating habenula responses to changes in ambient illumination

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Biology, November 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
31 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Characterization of a thalamic nucleus mediating habenula responses to changes in ambient illumination
Published in
BMC Biology, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12915-017-0431-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ruey-Kuang Cheng, Seetha Krishnan, Qian Lin, Caroline Kibat, Suresh Jesuthasan

Abstract

Neural activity in the vertebrate habenula is affected by ambient illumination. The nucleus that links photoreceptor activity with the habenula is not well characterized. Here, we describe the location, inputs and potential function of this nucleus in larval zebrafish. High-speed calcium imaging shows that light ON and OFF both evoke a rapid response in the dorsal left neuropil of the habenula, indicating preferential targeting of this neuropil by afferents conveying information about ambient illumination. Injection of a lipophilic dye into this neuropil led to bilateral labeling of a nucleus in the anterior thalamus that responds to light ON and OFF, and that receives innervation from the retina and pineal organ. Lesioning the neuropil of this thalamic nucleus reduced the habenula response to light ON and OFF. Optogenetic stimulation of the thalamus with channelrhodopsin-2 caused depolarization in the habenula, while manipulation with anion channelrhodopsins inhibited habenula response to light and disrupted climbing and diving evoked by illumination change. A nucleus in the anterior thalamus of larval zebrafish innervates the dorsal left habenula. This nucleus receives input from the retina and pineal, responds to increase and decrease in ambient illumination, enables habenula responses to change in irradiance, and may function in light-evoked vertical migration.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 23%
Student > Master 6 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 13%
Student > Bachelor 3 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 6%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 6 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 11 35%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 10%
Decision Sciences 1 3%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 6 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 May 2019.
All research outputs
#1,962,731
of 14,990,969 outputs
Outputs from BMC Biology
#582
of 1,279 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#62,076
of 319,719 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Biology
#74
of 127 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,990,969 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,279 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 319,719 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 127 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.