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Nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) supplementation ameliorates the impact of maternal obesity in mice: comparison with exercise

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
16 news outlets
twitter
21 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
45 Mendeley
Title
Nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) supplementation ameliorates the impact of maternal obesity in mice: comparison with exercise
Published in
Scientific Reports, November 2017
DOI 10.1038/s41598-017-14866-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Golam Mezbah Uddin, Neil A. Youngson, Bronte M. Doyle, David A. Sinclair, Margaret J. Morris

Abstract

Maternal overnutrition increases the risk of long-term metabolic dysfunction in offspring. Exercise improves metabolism partly by upregulating mitochondrial biogenesis or function, via increased levels of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)). We have shown that the NAD(+) precursor, nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) can reverse some of the negative consequences of high fat diet (HFD) consumption. To investigate whether NMN can impact developmentally-set metabolic deficits, we compared treadmill exercise and NMN injection in offspring of obese mothers. Five week old lean and obese female C57BL6/J mice were mated with chow fed males. Female offspring weaned onto HFD were given treadmill exercise for 9 weeks, or NMN injection daily for 18 days. Maternal obesity programmed increased adiposity and liver triglycerides, with decreased glucose tolerance, liver NAD(+) levels and citrate synthase activity in offspring. Both interventions reduced adiposity, and showed a modest improvement in glucose tolerance and improved markers of mitochondrial function. NMN appeared to have stronger effects on liver fat catabolism (Hadh) and synthesis (Fasn) than exercise. The interventions appeared to exert the most global benefit in mice that were most metabolically challenged (HFD-consuming offspring of obese mothers). This work encourages further study to confirm the suitability of NMN for use in reversing metabolic dysfunction linked to programming by maternal obesity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 21 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 45 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 29%
Student > Master 9 20%
Researcher 8 18%
Unspecified 5 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 7%
Other 7 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 18%
Unspecified 6 13%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 4%
Other 8 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 132. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 July 2019.
All research outputs
#114,865
of 13,628,925 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#1,468
of 67,204 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,557
of 315,587 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#273
of 13,134 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,628,925 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 67,204 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 315,587 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13,134 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.