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Lack of cytomegalovirus detection in human glioma

Overview of attention for article published in Virology Journal, November 2017
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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22 Mendeley
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Title
Lack of cytomegalovirus detection in human glioma
Published in
Virology Journal, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12985-017-0885-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Araceli Garcia-Martinez, Cristina Alenda, Esperanza Irles, Enrique Ochoa, Teresa Quintanar, Alvaro Rodriguez-Lescure, Jose L. Soto, Victor M. Barbera

Abstract

Gliomas are the most common brain tumors and include a variety of histologic types and grades of malignancy. They arise from glial cells and represent approximately 70% of the primary brain tumors. According to the criteria of the World Health Organization (WHO), the majority of gliomas can be classified into four grades of malignancy (I-IV). Virus infection, especially by DNA viruses and retroviruses, which may cause insertion of viral DNA sequences into the host genome, often triggers the host defense mechanisms. Particularly, the DNA methylation machinery can be activated to cause the methylation of foreign movable viral sequences and, therefore, silence viral gene expression. Several studies have shown the presence of Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in glioblastoma, suggesting that the virus may participate in tumor pathogenesis. But this relationship is controversial because many other studies did not detect HCMV in these tumors. This study aims to detect the presence of HCMV in several samples of human glioma (94 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples and 28 snap-frozen samples) by different sensitive techniques. We have been unable to detect HCMV DNA and proteins in glioma samples. Therefore, arguments used so far to conclude that HCMV is an oncomodulator virus in gliomas must be, in our view, seriously reconsidered.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 27%
Student > Master 5 23%
Student > Bachelor 2 9%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 5%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 5%
Other 5 23%
Unknown 2 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 32%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 27%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 18%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 November 2017.
All research outputs
#7,589,281
of 12,145,106 outputs
Outputs from Virology Journal
#1,287
of 2,054 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#160,683
of 285,147 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Virology Journal
#45
of 81 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,145,106 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,054 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 285,147 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 81 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.