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SOX4 inhibits GBM cell growth and induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest through Akt-p53 axis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Neurology, November 2014
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Title
SOX4 inhibits GBM cell growth and induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest through Akt-p53 axis
Published in
BMC Neurology, November 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12883-014-0207-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jing Zhang, Huawei Jiang, Jiaofang Shao, Ruifang Mao, Jie Liu, Yingying Ma, Xuefeng Fang, Na Zhao, Shu Zheng, Biaoyang Lin

Abstract

BackgroundSOX4 is a transcription factor required for tissue development and differentiation in vertebrates. Overexpression of SOX4 has been reported in many cancers including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), however, the underlying mechanism of actions has not been studied. In this study, we investigated the role of SOX4 in GBM.MethodsKaplan-Meier analysis was performed to assess the association between SOX4 expression levels and survival times in primary GBM samples. Cre/lox P system was used to generate gain or loss of SOX4 in GBM cells, and microarray analysis uncovered the regulation network of SOX4 in GBM cells.ResultsHigh SOX4 expression was significantly associated with good prognosis of primary GBMs. SOX4 inhibited the growth of GBM cell line LN229, A172G and U87MG, partly via the activation of p53-p21 signaling and down-regulation of phosphorylated AKT1. Gene expression profiling and subsequent gene ontology analysis showed that SOX4 influenced several key pathways including the Wnt/ beta-catenin and TGF-beta signaling pathways.ConclusionsOur study found that SOX4 acts as a tumor suppressor in GBM cells by induce cell cycle arrest and inhibiting cell growth.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 28 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 39%
Researcher 6 21%
Student > Master 6 21%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 7%
Unknown 3 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 39%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 36%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 11%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 4%
Unknown 3 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 November 2014.
All research outputs
#8,458,594
of 9,723,133 outputs
Outputs from BMC Neurology
#1,206
of 1,327 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#168,952
of 208,297 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Neurology
#32
of 36 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,723,133 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,327 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 208,297 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 36 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.