↓ Skip to main content

Mesenchymal stem cells for the prevention and treatment of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm infants

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, November 2017
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
26 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
72 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Mesenchymal stem cells for the prevention and treatment of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm infants
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, November 2017
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd011932.pub2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maria Pierro, Bernard Thébaud, Roger Soll

Abstract

Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) remains a major complication of prematurity and currently lacks efficient treatments. Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have been extensively explored as a potential therapy in several preclinical and clinical settings. Human and animal MSCs have been shown to prevent and treat lung injury in various preclinical models of lung diseases, including experimental BPD. To determine if MSCs, administered intravenously or endotracheally, are safe and effective in preventing or treating BPD, or both, in preterm infants. We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2016, Issue 10), MEDLINE via PubMed (1966 to 6 November 2016), Embase (1980 to 6 November 2016), and CINAHL (1982 to 6 November 2016). We also searched clinical trials databases, conference proceedings, and the reference lists of retrieved articles for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs. We considered RCTs and quasi-RCTs investigating prevention or treatment of BPD, or both, in preterm infants. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality according to prespecified criteria. We found no RCTs or quasi-RCTs addressing the use of MSCs for prevention or treatment of BPD in premature infants. Two RCTs are currently registered and ongoing. There is insufficient evidence to determine the safety and efficacy of MSCs in the treatment or prevention of BPD in premature infants. The results of the ongoing trials addressing this issue are expected in the near future.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 72 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 72 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 12 17%
Researcher 12 17%
Student > Master 9 13%
Student > Postgraduate 7 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 8%
Other 12 17%
Unknown 14 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 31 43%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 13%
Social Sciences 6 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 6%
Psychology 3 4%
Other 3 4%
Unknown 16 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 November 2017.
All research outputs
#9,618,999
of 12,527,219 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#9,028
of 9,882 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#207,264
of 311,080 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#172
of 183 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,527,219 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,882 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.5. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 311,080 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 183 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.