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Interventions for treating collagenous colitis

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, November 2017
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Title
Interventions for treating collagenous colitis
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, November 2017
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd003575.pub6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tahir S Kafil, Tran M Nguyen, Petrease H Patton, John K MacDonald, Nilesh Chande, John WD McDonald

Abstract

Collagenous colitis is a cause of chronic diarrhea. This updated review was performed to identify therapies for collagenous colitis that have been assessed in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The primary objective was to assess the benefits and harms of treatments for collagenous colitis. We searched CENTRAL, the Cochrane IBD Group Specialized Register, MEDLINE and EMBASE from inception to 7 November 2016. We included RCTs comparing a therapy with placebo or active comparator for the treatment of active or quiescent collagenous colitis. Data were independently extracted by two authors. The primary outcome was clinical response or maintenance of response as defined by the included studies. Secondary outcome measures included histological response, quality of life and the occurrence of adverse events. Risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for dichotomous outcomes. The Cochrane risk of bias tool was used to assess bias. The overall quality of the evidence was assessed using the GRADE criteria. Twelve RCTs (476 participants) were included. These studies assessed bismuth subsalicylate, Boswellia serrata extract, mesalamine, cholestyramine, probiotics, prednisolone and budesonide therapy. Four studies were low risk of bias. One study assessing mesalamine and cholestyramine was judged to be high risk of bias due to no blinding. The other studies had an unclear risk of bias for random sequence generation (five studies) allocation concealment (six studies), blinding (one study), incomplete outcome data (one study) and selective outcome reporting (one study). Clinical response occurred in 100% (4/4) of patients who received bismuth subsalicylate (nine 262 mg tablets daily for 8 weeks) compared to 0% (0/5) of patients who received placebo (1 study; 9 participants; RR 10.80, 95% CI 0.75 to 155.93; GRADE = very low). Clinical response occurred in 44% (7/16) of patients who received Boswellia serrata extract (three 400 mg/day capsules for 8 weeks) compared to 27% (4/15) of patients who received placebo (1 study; 31 participants; RR 1.64, 95% CI 0.60 to 4.49; GRADE = low). Clinical response occurred in 80% (24/30) of budesonide patients compared to 44% (11/25) of mesalamine patients (1 study; 55 participants; RR 1.82, 95% CI 1.13 to 2.93; GRADE = low). Histological response was observed in 87% (26/30) of budesonide patients compared to 44% (11/25) of mesalamine patients (1 study, 55 participants; RR 1.97, 95% CI 1.24 to 3.13; GRADE = low). There was no difference between the two treatments with respect to adverse events (RR 0.69, 95% CI 0.43 to 1.10; GRADE = low), withdrawals due to adverse events (RR 0.09, 95% CI 0.01 to 1.65; GRADE = low) and serious adverse events (RR 0.12, 95% CI 0.01 to 2.21; GRADE = low). Clinical response occurred in 44% (11/25) of mesalamine patients (3 g/day) compared to 59% (22/37) of placebo patients (1 study; 62 participants; RR 0.74, 95% CI 0.44 to 1.24; GRADE = low). Histological response was observed in 44% (11/25) and 51% (19/37) of patients receiving mesalamine and placebo, respectively (1 study; 62 participants; RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.50 to 1.47; GRADE = low). There was no difference between the two treatments with respect to adverse events (RR 1.26, 95% CI 0.84 to 1.88; GRADE = low), withdrawals due to adverse events (RR 5.92, 95% CI 0.70 to 49.90; GRADE = low) and serious adverse events (RR 4.44, 95% CI 0.49 to 40.29; GRADE = low). Clinical response occurred in 63% (5/8) of prednisolone (50 mg/day for 2 weeks) patients compared to 0% (0/3) of placebo patients (1 study, 11 participants; RR 4.89, 95% CI 0.35 to 68.83; GRADE = very low). Clinical response occurred in 29% (6/21) of patients who received probiotics (2 capsules containing 0.5 x 10(10) CFU each of L. acidophilus LA-5 and B. animalis subsp. lactis strain BB-12 twice daily for 12 weeks) compared to 13% (1/8) of placebo patients (1 study, 29 participants, RR 2.29, 95% CI 0.32 to 16.13; GRADE = very low). Clinical response occurred in 73% (8/11) of patients who received mesalamine (800 mg three times daily) compared to 100% (12/12) of patients who received mesalamine + cholestyramine (4 g daily) (1 study, 23 participants; RR 0.74, 95% CI 0.50 to 1.08; GRADE = very low). Clinical response occurred in 81% (38/47) of patients who received budesonide (9 mg daily in a tapering schedule for 6 to 8 weeks) compared to 17% (8/47) of placebo patients (3 studies; 94 participants; RR 4.56, 95% CI 2.43 to 8.55; GRADE = low). Histological response was higher in budesonide participants (72%, 34/47) compared to placebo (17%, 8/47) (RR 4.15, 95% CI 2.25 to 7.66; GRADE = low). Clinical response was maintained in 68% (57/84) of budesonide patients compared to 20% (18/88) of placebo patients (3 studies, 172 participants, RR 3.30 95% CI 2.13 to 5.09; GRADE = low). Histological response was maintained in 48% (19/40) of budesonide patients compared to 15% (6/40) of placebo patients (2 studies; 80 participants; RR 3.17, 95% CI 1.44 to 6.95; GRADE = very low). No difference was found between budesonide and placebo for adverse events (5 studies; 290 participants; RR 1.18, o95% CI 0.92 to 1.51; GRADE = low), withdrawals due to adverse events (5 studies, 290 participants; RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.43 to 2.17; GRADE = very low) or serious adverse events (4 studies, 175 participants; RR 1.11, 95% CI 0.15 to 8.01; GRADE = very low). Adverse effects reported in the budesonide studies include nausea, vomiting, neck pain, abdominal pain, excessive sweating and headache. Adverse effects reported in the mesalamine studies included nausea and skin rash. Adverse effects in the prednisolone study included abdominal pain, headache, sleep disturbance, mood change and weight gain. Low quality evidence suggests that budesonide may be effective for inducing and maintaining clinical and histological response in patients with collagenous colitis. We are uncertain about the benefits and harms of therapy with bismuth subsalicylate, Boswellia serrata extract, mesalamine with or without cholestramine, prednisolone and probiotics. These agents and other therapies require further study.

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Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 December 2017.
All research outputs
#4,210,670
of 8,758,289 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#7,021
of 8,757 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#89,007
of 196,869 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#128
of 141 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,758,289 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,757 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.2. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 196,869 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 141 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.