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Cross sectional study in China: fetal gender has adverse perinatal outcomes in mainland China

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, October 2014
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1 tweeter

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Title
Cross sectional study in China: fetal gender has adverse perinatal outcomes in mainland China
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, October 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12884-014-0372-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lei Hou, Xin Wang, Guanghui Li, Liying Zou, Yi Chen, Weiyuan Zhang

Abstract

BackgroundThe association between fetal gender and pregnancy outcomes has been thoroughly demonstrated in western populations. However, this association has not been thoroughly documented in China. The primary objective of the present study is to determine whether the association of adverse pregnancy and labour outcomes with male fetuses applies to the Chinese population.MethodsThis cross-sectional hospital-based retrospective survey collected data from thirty-nine hospitals in 2011 in mainland China. A total of 109,722 women with singleton pregnancy who delivered after 28 weeks of gestation were included.ResultsOf these pregnancies, the male-to-female sex ratio was 1.2. The rates of preterm birth (7.3% for males, 6.5% for females) and fetal macrosomia (8.3% for males, 5.1% for females) were higher for male newborns, whereas fetal growth restriction (8.0% for females, 5.4% for males) and malpresentation (4.3% for females, 3.6% for males) were more frequent among female-bearing mothers. A male fetus was associated with an increased incidence of operative vaginal delivery (1.3% for males, 1.1% for females), caesarean delivery (55.0% for males, 52.9% for females), and cephalopelvic disproportion/failure to progress (10.0% for males, 9.2% for female). Male gender was also significantly associated with lower Apgar scores (<7 at 5 min, adjusted odds ratio 1.3, 95% CI 1.0-1.6), as well as a neonatal intensive care unit admission and neonatal death, even after adjustments for confounders (adjusted odds ratio 1.3, 95% CI 1.1-1.5, adjusted odds ratio 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-1.8).ConclusionWe confirm the existence of obvious neonatal gender bias and adverse outcomes for male fetuses during pregnancy and labour in our population. Further research is required to understand the mechanisms and clinical implications of this phenomenon.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 60 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 23%
Student > Bachelor 9 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 10%
Other 5 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 5%
Other 9 15%
Unknown 14 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 42%
Psychology 6 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 5%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 3%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 2%
Other 7 12%
Unknown 16 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 November 2014.
All research outputs
#3,058,608
of 4,507,652 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#933
of 1,124 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#82,807
of 122,805 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#63
of 73 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 1,124 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 73 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.