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MicroRNA expression patterns in canine mammary cancer show significant differences between metastatic and non-metastatic tumours

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, November 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (63rd percentile)

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3 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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19 Mendeley
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Title
MicroRNA expression patterns in canine mammary cancer show significant differences between metastatic and non-metastatic tumours
Published in
BMC Cancer, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12885-017-3751-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Malgorzata Bulkowska, Agata Rybicka, Kerem Mert Senses, Katarzyna Ulewicz, Katarzyna Witt, Joanna Szymanska, Bartlomiej Taciak, Robert Klopfleisch, Eva Hellmén, Izabella Dolka, Ali O. Gure, Joanna Mucha, Mariusz Mikow, Slawomir Gizinski, Magdalena Krol

Abstract

MicroRNAs may act as oncogenes or tumour suppressor genes, which make these small molecules potential diagnostic/prognostic factors and targets for anticancer therapies. Several common oncogenic microRNAs have been found for canine mammary cancer and human breast cancer. On account of this, large-scale profiling of microRNA expression in canine mammary cancer seems to be important for both dogs and humans. Expression profiles of 317 microRNAs in 146 canine mammary tumours of different histological type, malignancy grade and clinical history (presence/absence of metastases) and in 25 control samples were evaluated. The profiling was performed using microarrays. Significance Analysis of Microarrays test was applied in the analysis of microarray data (both unsupervised and supervised data analyses were performed). Validation of the obtained results was performed using real-time qPCR. Subsequently, predicted targets for the microRNAs were searched for in miRBase. Results of the unsupervised analysis indicate that the primary factor separating the samples is the metastasis status. Predicted targets for microRNAs differentially expressed in the metastatic vs. non-metastatic group are mostly engaged in cell cycle regulation, cell differentiation and DNA-damage repair. On the other hand, the supervised analysis reveals clusters of differentially expressed microRNAs unique for the tumour type, malignancy grade and metastasis factor. The most significant difference in microRNA expression was observed between the metastatic and non-metastatic group, which suggests a more important role of microRNAs in the metastasis process than in the malignant transformation. Moreover, the differentially expressed microRNAs constitute potential metastasis markers. However, validation of cfa-miR-144, cfa-miR-32 and cfa-miR-374a levels in blood samples did not follow changes observed in the non-metastatic and metastatic tumours.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 19 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 32%
Researcher 3 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 11%
Student > Postgraduate 2 11%
Student > Master 2 11%
Other 4 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 32%
Unspecified 4 21%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 11%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 November 2017.
All research outputs
#7,207,845
of 12,134,677 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#1,891
of 4,441 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#143,490
of 281,141 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#96
of 270 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,134,677 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,441 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,141 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 270 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.