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Cyclic Avian Mass Mortality in the Northeastern United States Is Associated with a Novel Orthomyxovirus

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Virology, January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
twitter
5 tweeters
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
40 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
72 Mendeley
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Title
Cyclic Avian Mass Mortality in the Northeastern United States Is Associated with a Novel Orthomyxovirus
Published in
Journal of Virology, January 2015
DOI 10.1128/jvi.02019-14
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew B. Allison, Jennifer R. Ballard, Robert B. Tesh, Justin D. Brown, Mark G. Ruder, M. Kevin Keel, Brandon A. Munk, Randall M. Mickley, Samantha E. J. Gibbs, Amelia P. A. Travassos da Rosa, Julie C. Ellis, Hon S. Ip, Valerie I. Shearn-Bochsler, Matthew B. Rogers, Elodie Ghedin, Edward C. Holmes, Colin R. Parrish, Chris Dwyer

Abstract

Since 1998, cyclic mortality events in common eiders (Somateria mollissima), numbering in the hundreds to thousands of dead birds, have been documented along the coast of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA. Although longitudinal disease investigations have uncovered potential contributing factors responsible for these outbreaks, detecting a primary etiological agent has proven enigmatic. Here we identify a novel orthomyxovirus, tentatively named Wellfleet Bay virus (WFBV), as a potential causative agent of these outbreaks. Genomic analysis of WFBV revealed that it is most closely related to members of the Quaranjavirus genus within the family Orthomyxoviridae. Similar to other members of the genus, WFBV contains an alphabaculovirus gp64-like glycoprotein, which was demonstrated to have fusion activity, and also tentatively suggests that ticks (and/or insects) may vector the virus in nature. However, in addition to the six RNA segments encoding the prototypical structural proteins identified in other quaranjaviruses, a previously unknown RNA segment (segment 7) encoding a novel protein designated as VP7 was discovered in WFBV. Although WFBV shows low to moderate levels of sequence similarity to Quaranfil virus and Johnston Atoll virus, the original members of the Quaranjavirus genus, additional antigenic and genetic analyses demonstrated that it is closely related to the recently identified Cygnet River virus (CyRV) from South Australia, suggesting that WFBV and CyRV may be geographic variants of the same virus. Although the identification of WFBV in part may resolve the enigma of these mass mortality events, the details of the ecology and epidemiology of the virus remain to be determined.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 72 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 3%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Denmark 1 1%
Unknown 68 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 26%
Researcher 13 18%
Student > Master 8 11%
Student > Bachelor 6 8%
Other 5 7%
Other 15 21%
Unknown 6 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 25 35%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 10%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 6 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 6%
Other 6 8%
Unknown 13 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 29. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 October 2019.
All research outputs
#896,857
of 18,404,646 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Virology
#422
of 22,525 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13,472
of 240,576 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Virology
#7
of 200 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,404,646 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 22,525 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 240,576 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 200 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.